Thermopylae


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Related to Thermopylae: XERXES, Leonidas, battle of Marathon

Thermopylae

(thərmŏp`ĭlē) [Gr.,=hot gates, from hot mineral springs nearby], pass, E central Greece, SE of Lamía, between the cliffs of Mt. Oeta and the Malic Gulf. Silt accumulation has gradually widened the once-narrow pass. In ancient times it was used as an entrance into Greece from the north. There in 480 B.C., LeonidasLeonidas
, d. 480 B.C., king of Sparta. He succeeded (c.491 B.C.) his half-brother, Cleomenes I. When the Persians invaded Greece under Xerxes (480 B.C.), Leonidas with 300 Spartans and 5,000 auxiliaries was given the pass at Thermopylae to hold. There was treachery.
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 with his Spartans and their allies lost a heroic battle to the Persians under Xerxes IXerxes I
(Xerxes the Great) , d. 465 B.C., king of ancient Persia (486–465 B.C.). His name in Old Persian is Khshayarsha, in the Bible Ahasuerus. He was the son of Darius I and Atossa, daughter of Cyrus the Great. After bringing (484 BC.
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 (see Persian WarsPersian Wars,
500 B.C.–449 B.C., series of conflicts fought between Greek states and the Persian Empire. The writings of Herodotus, who was born c.484 B.C., are the great source of knowledge of the history of the wars.
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). At the pass in 279 B.C., the Greeks held back the Gauls under BrennusBrennus,
d. 279 B.C., Gallic leader. He was in command of the band of Gauls (or Galatians) who invaded Greece in 279 B.C. At first halted at Thermopylae, he later turned and took the pass into Doris.
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, who ultimately broke through, and, in 191 B.C., Antiochus IIIAntiochus III
(Antiochus the Great), d. 187 B.C., king of Syria (223–187 B.C.), son of Seleucus II and younger brother of Seleucus III, whom he succeeded. At his accession the Seleucid empire was in decline.
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 of Syria was defeated there by the Romans.

Thermopylae

 

a mountain pass in Greece, on the border between Thessaly and central Greece, south of Lamia. In 480 B.C., during the Greco-Persian Wars, Thermopylae was the site of a major battle. Under the command of the king of Sparta, Leonidas, an allied Greek army of approximately 5,000 men blocked the pass and held off thousands of Persian troops, led by the King of Persia, Xerxes. With the help of a deserter, the Persians succeeded in reaching the rear of the Greek forces. Leonidas then dispatched troops to defend Athens, and he and 300 Spartan troops continued their stubborn defense to the last man. The Spartans later erected a monument at the site where the heroes died.

Thermopylae

300 Spartans hold off Xerxes’ horde (480 B.C.). [Classical Hist.: Harbottle Battles, 248]
See: Battle

Thermopylae

shown the back door, Persians destroyed Spartans (480 B.C.). [Gk. Hist.: Harbottle, 248]

Thermopylae

(in ancient Greece) a narrow pass between the mountains and the sea linking Locris and Thessaly: a defensible position on a traditional invasion route from N Greece; scene of a famous battle (480 bc) in which a greatly outnumbered Greek army under Leonidas fought to the death to delay the advance of the Persians during their attempted conquest of Greece
References in periodicals archive ?
The heroic tales of Thermopylae and Salamis have overshadowed subsequent operations and the huge role played by the Spartans in evicting the Persian invaders from Greece.
The events here happened before, during and after the Battle of Thermopylae depicted in "300.
After the defeat at Thermopylae, he leads a small Greek navy against a huge Persian armada led by bloodthirsty Artemisia (Eva Green), hoping that Queen Gorgo and her Spartan forces will join in the battle for a free, united Greece.
At Thermopylae, company executives tasked engineers with finding new ways to use Glass in a military setting, said Chief Innovation Officer John Clark.
It occurred simultaneously with the naval battle at Artemisium at the narrow coastal pass of Thermopylae ("The Hot Gates").
On one hand, a blinded Eurytus forced his slave to return him to Thermopylae and die with him in battle--selfishly to preserve his perceived sense of honor.
In the ensuing naval and land battles, Xerxes lost 400 ships, not to mention the land battle of Thermopylae, where 7000 Greeks held off the great Persian army.
The heroic Greek (largely Spartan) standoff at the pass of Thermopylae in 480 BCE signified not ignominy or defeat, but self-sacrifice or martyrdom for the "greater good of Western civilization" This devastation on land then inspired the Greeks' unity and courage at sea, and it led to their ultimate triumph in the battle off the coast of Salamis in 480 BCE.
Fans of Sin City and Frank Miller's comic books will adore this heavily fictionalised recreation of the historic battle of Thermopylae.
The version of Thermopylae in my 'piece' could never have been of my own making as DJ asserts.
These historical events have striking similarities with Leonidas and the 300 Spartans fighting the Battle at Thermopylae.
During one of the most famous battles in history, 300 Spartans held off thousands of Persian soldiers at the mountain pass of Thermopylae (thur-MAH-puh-lee).