Gelada

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Gelada

 

(Theropithecus gelada), a monkey of the family Cercopithecidae, order of Primates. In males body length is 70-74 cm; tail length, 46-50 cm; and weight, approximately 20 kg. Females are smaller: body length, 50-65 cm; weight, approximately 13 kg. Geladas resemble baboons. The male’s mantle of fur is brown, and the female has gray fur. There is an hourglass patch of bare red skin on the chest. Geladas are found in the mountains of Ethiopia above 2,000 m. They live in rocky areas in herds of up to 400 and feed on onions, grasses, and insects. They rarely climb trees.

M. F. NESTURKH

References in periodicals archive ?
(1995): Presence of the cercopithecid genus Theropithecus in Cueva Victoria (Murcia, Spain).
The primates examined represent a cross-section of species found at the Swartkrans site and include Theropithecus danieli, Dinopithecus ingens and Papio robinsoni.
Identification in gelada baboons (Theropithecus gelada) of a distinct simian T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 with a broad range of Western blot reactivity.
nictitans; Cto, Cerococebus torquatus; Ppa, Papio papio; Ph, Papio hamadryas; Tge, Theropithecus gelada.
Kummer, "Rules of dyad and group formation among captive gelada baboons (Theropithecus gelada)," in Proceedings of the Fifth Congress of the International Primatological Society, S.
Theropithecus (Theropithecus) oswaldi Andrews, 1916
The Iberian remains of Theropithecus, unambiguously recorded at Cueva Victoria by dental remains (Gibert et al., 1995), were attributed to T.
Cercopithecines, in turn, are recorded by Macaca, from the latest Miocene onwards, as well as by Paradolichopithecus from the Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene, and Theropithecus from the Early Pleistocene.
Subsequent dispersal and range extension events took place into the Iberian Peninsula during the Pleistocene, as reflected by the record of the gelada Theropithecus at ca.