Thessalonian


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Thessalonian

1. of or relating to ancient Thessalonica (modern Salonika)
2. an inhabitant of ancient Thessalonica
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
We get the sense from First Thessalonians that Paul tries, at least at first, to fill the gap left by the separation.
The conclusion arrived at by Plevnik is that Paul had to adjust the thinking of the Thessalonian believers to accept that they would be assumed at the parousia.
The Thessalonian strategy is less Chicken Little and more ostrich-like in its method.
Turning from geographical to theologico-personal focus, the two major chapters, entitled "Paul" and "Luke"--meaning exclusively "1 Thessalonians" and "Acts 17:1-10"--might to some extent be considered a "commentary on the commentaries." Paul's Thessalonicher (109) are mostly Jewish or "God-fearing" Greeks in Acts 17:4; but in 1 Thessalonians 1:9 they are clearly (ex-)pagan worshipers of Cabirus or Dionysus, a Thracian-Phrygian cult marked by Rosalienfest of roses and wreaths placed at a co-worshiper's grave by night--disapproved in 1 Thessalonians 5:7 (114-128).
For instance, if its whole articulation is programmatically stated at 1: 3, [Greek Text Omitted], then these three qualities and their security or fragility in the Thessalonian church can be seen as the subjects, in turn, of three sections: faith, at 2: 13-3: 10; love, at 4: 3-12; and hope, at 4: 13-5: 11.
Because the authenticity of 2 Thessalonians is challenged by some, for example, he does not make it one of his main exegetical passages.
Habakkuk 1:1-4; 2:1-4; Psalm 119:137-144; 2 Thessalonians 1:1-4, 11-12; Luke 19:1-10
1 Thessalonians 5:11 In the workplace, words of encouragement matter.
For since we believe that Jesus died and was raised to life again, we also believe that when Jesus returns, God will bring back with Him the believers who have died." (1 Thessalonians 4:13-14).
In the Bible, 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18 tells us, 'Rejoice always, pray continually, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is God's will for you in Christ Jesus.' In all family gatherings, we should be mindful that every moment spent together is a blessing from above.
Among the topics are the reception of 1 and 2 Maccabees in the letters of Paul, the centrality of Jewish scripture in Paul's theology: Romans 3 as a case in point, from the perspective of the writer or the perspective of the reader: coming to grips with a starting point for analyzing the use of scripture in 1 Corinthians, the rhetoric of "consolation" in 2 Corinthians 1:3-11/7:4-13 in the context of the Jewish and Graeco-Roman consolitary literature, and the reception of the Old Testament in 1 Thessalonians and in Philippians.
The Apostle Paul, writing to the Thessalonians, calls on them to improve their present condition.