Theudas


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Theudas

(thyo͞o`dăs), leader of insurgents mentioned by Gamaliel, and probably to be identified with the Theudas who organized a revolt against the Romans when Fadus was procurator of Judea (A.D. 44–46). He is mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles and Josephus' Jewish Antiquities.
References in periodicals archive ?
While pigeons' service to man earns them the immortality associated with individual names, however, the poem emphasizes the pigeon's fundamental humility: "he is not Theudas / boasting himself to be some- / body, this anonymous post- / man" (103).
For some time ago, Theudas rose up claiming to be somebody, and a number of men, about four hundred, joined him; but he was killed, and all who followed him were dispersed and disappeared.
Gamaliel, a Pharisee, compares the situation to that of Theudas' and later Judas the Galilean's uprising (5:36-37).
One recent survey chronicled several hundred predictions of the Messiah's return and the end of time as we know it, beginning with Theudas's announcement in A.D.
Jesus was turned over to the Roman Governor who reached his own judgment that this alleged would-be messiah should be publicly executed, but was not so dangerous to make it necessary to round up and kill his followers, which is what the Romans subsequently did in suppressing the popular protest movements led by Theudas and the Jewish rabble-rouser known as "the Egyptian." (12)
Chapter 4 looks at the `sign prophets', the six individuals or groups who led movements (such as Theudas and other figures in the decade or so before the fall of the temple).
Theudas, "boasting himself to be somebody," had been killed.
Luke wrongly dates the birth of Jesus and Theudas's uprising.