Thiessen polygon method

Thiessen polygon method

[′tē·sən ′päl·i‚gän ‚meth·əd]
(meteorology)
A method of assigning areal significance to point rainfall values: perpendicular bisectors are constructed to the lines joining each measuring station with those immediately surrounding it; the bisectors form a series of polygons, each polygon containing one station; the value of precipitation measured at a station is assigned to the whole area covered by the enclosing polygon.
References in periodicals archive ?
The present study was conducted to test the existence of monotonic trends and relative change (step change) in the annual and seasonal regional maximum minimum and mean and diurnal temperature data produced by thiessen polygon method from a meteorological network of stations in Mangla watershed for the period 1971-2010.
The regional seasonal and annual temperature time series for the study area and as well as for all sub-basins from these 13 climatic stations were computed using the thiessen polygon method. Distribution of mean monthly maximum and minimum temperature in Mangla catchment
The present study analyses the investigation of annual and seasonal maximum minimum mean and diurnal temperatures in Mangla watershed and its sub-basins (Kanshi Poonch Kunhar and Neelum) for period (1971-2010) by student t test Mann Whitney U Spearman and Mann Kendall tests in time series of temperature for Mangla catchment and its sub-basins (Kanshi Poonch Kunhar and Neelum) on spatially distributed temperature data produced by thiessen polygon method. The overall results of this study reveal that climate change is being observed.
Zhang, "Improvement and optimization of thiessen polygon method boundary treatment program," in Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Geoinformatics, pp.
Two of the most widely accepted techniques to compute average precipitation depth are the Thiessen Polygon method and the Isohyetal method.
By the Thiessen Polygon method, the areas represented by the polygons surrounding each rain gauge are determined with a planimeter and substituted in Equation 3.1: