thinner

(redirected from Thinners)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

thinner

a solvent, such as turpentine, added to paint or varnish to dilute it, reduce its opacity or viscosity, or increase its penetration into the ground
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Thinner

Any volatile liquid that lowers the viscosity of a paint or varnish, and thus make it flow more easily; it must be compatible with the medium of the paint; the most common thinner is turpentine.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Thinner

 

a device for thinning sugar beet sprouts. It may be used in both irrigated and nonirrigated regions of beet cultivation. The thinner consists of L-shaped blades attached to cutters and disks. The USSR produces four-, six-, eight-, 12-, and 18-row thinners. As the thinner moves along the row of plants the cutters, rotating on a plane perpendicular to the direction of the machine’s movement, make slanting cuts in the rows to a depth of 3–4 cm, loosen the soil, and kill weeds in the vicinity of the row. Half sweeps secured on beams in front of the cutters cultivate the interrow spaces at the same time. The thinner is grouped with tractors in the 1.4- and 2-ton class. The cutters are driven by the machine’s supporting wheels. Thinners similar to those in the USSR are used abroad.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

thinner

[′thin·ər]
(materials)
A liquid used to thin paint, varnish, cement, or other material to a desired consistency.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

thinner, dilutent, solvent

A volatile liquid used to dilute and lower the viscosity of paints, adhesives, etc.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
What is thinner? And does it vary depending on the type of paint I'm using?
According to the DEQ, Monaco is permitted to use thinners that contain no more than 10 percent volatile hazardous air pollutants by weight.
The treatment of large doses of blood thinners came under stiff criticism, after Sharon suffered the major stroke and cerebral hemorrhage.
Thinners were applied to try to get rid of the paint and you flicked your lighter in close proximity to him in order, you said, to scare him.
(2004) also suggested that children of thinners may receive higher exposures than children of pesticide handlers (mixers, loaders, applicators).
Conversely, other factors such as inability to comply with medications, falling risk or head injury risk may influence a final decision not to use blood thinners.
Regarding paint thinners and multipurpose solvents, ACA noted that CARB is currently completing its 2012 Technology Review to determine if the 3% limit is commercially and technologically feasible.
Researchers investigated how fumes or spray from paints and thinners affected the health of construction workers.
Third, the divers used abrasive soaps (intended for cleaning horses) and turpentine-containing thinners to clean thick crusts off their skin.
Mohammed Salleem, aged 30, of Lye, near Stourbridge, was set alight when he started a blaze in an oil drum apparently unaware there was a vessel containing paint thinners inside it.
Blood thinners include anticoagulants such as warfarin (Coumadin[R]) and antiplatelet drugs, such as clopidogrel (Plavix[R]).