Thiophene


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Related to Thiophene: Thienyl

thiophene

[′thī·ə‚fēn]
(organic chemistry)
C4H4S A toxic, flammable, highly reactive, colorless liquid, insoluble in water, soluble in alcohol and ether, boils at 84°C; used as a chemical intermediate and to make condensation copolymers. Also known as thiofuran.

Thiophene

 

a heterocyclic compound. Thiophene is a colorless liquid with an odor similar to that of benzene. Melting point, –38.3°C, boiling point, 84.1°C. It is sparingly soluble in water but freely soluble in organic solvents.

Thiophene is contained in the benzene fraction of coal tar (from which it is extracted), as well as in the semicoking products of Volga shale. It may be produced synthetically by pyrolysis of a mixture containing the sodium salt of succinic acid and phosphorus trisulfide; it is also obtained from butane and sulfur and, using a method developed by Iu. K. Iur’ev, from furan. Thiophene is a typical aromatic compound: it can be readily halogenated, sulfurized, and alkylated. Certain thiophene derivatives are used as biologically active substances (modified penicillins; anthelmintics) and complexones (thienyltrifluoroacetone).

References in periodicals archive ?
NMR: [.sup.1]H NMR ([DMSO-d.sub.6], 300 MHz,): [delta]=6.60-7.25 (m, 7H, aromatic benzene and thiophene), 4.82 (s, 1H, ethylene), 4.90-5.92 (s, 2H, methine), 3.35 (s, 2H, methylene).
In the present study, 4% articaine showed better results as compared to that of 2% lidocaine due to following reason: increased lipid solubility, thiophene ring, increased protein binding which increases duration of action.
3.a exhibits the catalytic behavior of the diverse catalytic precursors calcined at different temperatures in the HDS reaction of thiophene compared with a commercial CoMo/[gamma]-[Al.sub.2][O.sub.3] catalyst.
6, during the treatment, the feed composed of n-heptane and thiophene permeated through the hollow fiber membrane chromatography by a peristaltic pump in a continuous manner, and the inlet sulfur concentration was 200 mg [L.sup.-1].
Sopbue et al., "Antibacterial and cytotoxic activities and SAR of some Azo compounds containing thiophene backbone," Pharmacologia, vol.
In a typical synthesis of polythiophene Pdots (Scheme 1), a solution of 10 ml of 1.0 M anhydrous Fe[Cl.sub.3] in anhydrous acetonitrile is added via syringe to a magnetically stirred solution of thiophene monomer (1 ml, 12.5 mmol) in anhydrous acetonitrile (60 ml) in a flask that is continuously purged with nitrogen.
This is presumably caused by two reasons: on the one hand, the torsion angle between the DPI and thiophene is smaller than BPI and thiophene (vide infra), leading to favorable charge transfer from the donor unit to the acceptor unit; on the other hand, the electron-donating ability of DPI is stronger than that of BPI due to the fact that four aromatic rings in the former are more propitious to conjugate extension.
In this paper, we explored the results deriving from an apparently simple variation on a bithiophene structure, evidencing that the proposed modification on the thiophene rings allows obtaining a more stable and more efficient sensoring device.
The thiophene ring mimicked the phenyl ring of pTyr which provided [pi]-[pi] interactions with Tyr46 and Phe182.
van Santen, "Periodic trends in hydrotreating catalysis: thiophene hydrodesulfurization over carbon-supported 4d transition metal sulfides," Journal of Catalysis, vol.
There are also numerous researches about the use of intrinsically conductive polymers for smart material applications, from which the systems based on thiophene derivatives and its composites, such as alkylthiophenes and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulphonate, respectively, seem to be most promising [9].