third-generation computer

third-generation computer

[′thərd ‚jen·ə¦rā·shən kəm′pyüd·ər]
(computer science)
One of the general purpose digital computers introduced in the late 1960s; it is characterized by integrated circuits and has logical organization and software which permit the computer to handle many programs at the same time, allow one to add or remove units from the computer, permit some or all input/output operations to occur at sites remote from the main processor, and allow conversational programming techniques.

third-generation computer

A computer that used integrated circuits, disk storage and online terminals. The third generation started roughly in 1964 with the IBM System/360. See computer generations and System/360.
References in periodicals archive ?
The uniqueness of SGI Altix systems stem from the integration of SGI's third-generation computer architecture NUMAflexTM, the advanced 64-bit Intel Itanium 2 processor and a Linux operating system -- a combination that constitutes a breakthrough both in terms of price/performance and in virtually every measurable category.
Today it's supercomputing and LANS; five years ago it was microcomputing; ten years ago it was microprocessing; 15 years ago it was virtual systems; 20 years ago it was minicomputing; 25 years ago it was third-generation computers; 30 years ago it was second-generation computers; and 35 years ago it was first-generation computers.

Full browser ?