passive smoking

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passive smoking

the inhalation of smoke from other people's cigarettes by a nonsmoker
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Researchers continue to study other possible dangers of thirdhand smoke.
Thirdhand smoke can damage epithelial cells in the respiratory system by stressing cells and causing them to fight for survival, a research team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found.
The study published in the journal 'JAMA Network Open' could assist physicians in treating patients exposed to thirdhand smoke.
When smokers move out and non-smokers move in: Residential thirdhand smoke pollution and exposure.
One study this year showed thirdhand smoke increased risk of lung cancer in mice.
"If you walk into a hotel room you were told is a nonsmoking room and you take one breath and you know it's not nonsmoking, that's thirdhand smoke. Thirdhand smoke is all over the place where smokers have been," explained Dr.
They said nicotine on the skin of a nonsmoker is a good proxy to measure exposure to thirdhand smoke.
It is important that you take steps to avoid inhaling secondhand smoke and to clean up lingering toxins that are referred to as thirdhand smoke. Thirdhand smoke is defined as "residual tobacco smoke contamination that remains after the cigarette is extinguished."
Previous studies have shown that nicotine in thirdhand smoke can react with the ozone in indoor air and surfaces such as clothing and furniture, to form other pollutants.
Thirdhand smoke is a complex phenomenon resulting from residual tobacco smoke pollutants that adhere to the clothing and hair of smokers and to surfaces, furnishings, and dust in indoor environments.
Researchers are also beginning to look into whether thirdhand smoke is harmful to health.
Atmospheric Chemistry Special Feature: Formation of carcinogens indoors by surface-mediated reactions of nicotine with nitrous acid, leading to potential thirdhand smoke hazards.