Thlaspi


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Thlaspi

 

a genus of annual or perennial herbs of the family Cruciferae. The leaves are entire. The cauline leaves are sessile and amplexicaul; the radical ones are petioled. The white or pink flowers are gathered in a panicle. The fruit is an oblate silicle. There are 60 species, distributed mainly in the temperate belt of the northern hemisphere. The plants also occur in South America. The USSR has about 25 species, growing primarily in the Caucasus.

The pennycress (T. arvense) is a weed with winter and spring forms. A single plant yields about 10,000 seeds, whose oil (constituting as much as 30 percent of the mass of a seed) is suitable for industrial use. The grass and seeds contain the glycoside sinigrin (potassium myronate), which has a strong garlic-like odor. Cows fed grain mixed with Thlaspi seeds produce milk with a garlic taste. T. perfoliatum grows on rocky slopes, in the steppes, and amid crops in the European USSR, the Caucasus, and Middle Asia.

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Cadmium accumulation in population of Thlaspi Caeruluscense and Thlaspi Goesingense.
Hyperaccumulation by the species of Alyssum and Thlaspi (Brassicaceae) from the ultramafic soils of the Balkans.
Phytochelatin synthase of Thlaspi caerulescens enhanced tolerance and accumulation of heavy metals when expressed in yeast and tobacco.
Hyperaccumulation of Cadmium by hairy roots of Thlaspi caerulescens, Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 67 (5): 607-615(2000).
However, it has been shown that the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens takes up Cd in the same pool as other plants (Hamon et al.
Environmental control of seed germination in Thlaspi arvense (Cruciferae).
Effects of apex removal and nutrient supplementation on branching and seed production in Thlaspi arvense (Brassicaceae).
Capsella bursa-pastoris, Cardamine hirsuta, Thlaspi arvense) and may have senesced by the time the vegetation surveys occurred in July.
vulgare, Conium maculaturn, Geranium dissectum, Glechoma hederacea, Lamium purpureum, Leonurus cardiaca, Lepidium campestre, Nepeta cataria, Saponaria officinalis, Taraxacum officinale, Thlaspi arvense, Verbascum thapsus, and Veronica arvensis.
A few examples of such plants are Thlaspi caerulescens for removal of zinc and cadmium, Berkheya coddii for removal of nickel, Asparagus racemosus for removal of selenium, Iberis intermedia for removal of thallium, Ipomoea alpina for removal of copper, Haumanistrum robertii for removal of cobalt and Pteris vitata for removal of arsenic [1].
Life history variation in the heavy metal tolerant plant Thlaspi caerulescens growing in a network of contaminated and noncontaminated sites in southern France: role of gene flow, selection and phenotypic plasticity.
Elevated expression of metal transporter genes in three accessions of the metal hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens.