Gallaudet, Thomas

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Gallaudet, Thomas (Hopkins)

(1787–1851) educator; born in Philadelphia. He studied European methods of deaf education before becoming the founding president of the first American free school for the deaf in Hartford, Conn. (1817–30). A pioneer in training teachers of the deaf, he also actively promoted the education of African-Americans and women. Gallaudet College, Washington, D.C., is named for him.
References in periodicals archive ?
En 1816, Thomas Gallaudet (1787-1851) trajo el lenguaje por senas frances a los Estados Unidos.
Award-winning historian Jill LePore has put together a curious little book that she calls "a collection of character sketches," The seven "characters" sketched are Noah Webster, William Thornton, Sequoyah, Thomas Gallaudet, Abd al-Raman Ibrahima, Samuel E B Morse, and Alexander Graham Bell.
His eldest son, Thomas Gallaudet, was a clergyman who devoted almost all his time to missionary work among the deaf; he founded St.
Clerc helped Thomas Gallaudet set up schools for the deaf in America.
A module on deaf culture summarizes the history of the deaf in the United States, including profiles of such influential people as Thomas Gallaudet and Alexander Graham Bell.
Clerc's speech, read by Thomas Gallaudet, strongly urged that one school be established: "I think one Institution for all is best.