submandibular duct

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submandibular duct

[¦səb·man′dib·yə·lər ′dəkt]
(anatomy)
The duct of the submandibular gland which empties into the mouth on the side of the frenulum of the tongue.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thomas Wharton was the first scientist who described umbilical cord as a primitive connective tissue in 1656.
The North Skelton mine was established by Bolckow and Vaughan on land owned by John Thomas Wharton, of Skelton Castle.
Thomas Wharton, 13, Whitley Bay High School pupil, of Whitley Bay, said: "I'm a big supporter of the team.
Luka sets out to steal the Fire of Life, but one wishes to see him steal a little more of his father's thunder." THOMAS WHARTON
THOMAS WHARTON WAS EMPLOYED AS A CARDIOLOGIST BY ATLANTIC CARDIOLOGY ASSOCIATES, P.A.
Authors include Alistair MacLeod, Jane Urquhart, Anne Michaels, Aritha Van Herk, Rudy Wiebe, Robert Kroetsch and Thomas Wharton.
Adam Thomas Wharton was killed in a car crash on the A55, near Rhuallt Hill, in the early hours of December 23
To be sure, some of the essays in this book fulfill its editors promises: Claire Omhovere's "The Melting of Time in Thomas Wharton's Icefields" re-imagines the prairies as a "living landscape" (43); Dennis Cooley, in "Documents in the Postmodern long Prairie Poem", reflects at length on the notion that poets engage with the prairies by "erasing old inscriptions, retaining versions of old subscriptions, and authoring new inscriptions" (184); and in "Time's Grip Along the Athabasca, 1920s and 1930s," Cam McEachern argues for the ways in which the Peace River district of Alberta was once, but is no longer, implicated in the promotion of early twentieth-century liberal ideology.
Conan Pierre, Eddy Wallace and Thomas Wharton completed a thrilling victory and set them up for their Supplementary Cup final with Meltham next week.
Less abstract and more accessible than Claire Omhovere's analysis of Thomas Wharton's Icefields as imagery for prairie history is Nina Van Gessel's, clear, compelling treatment of Carol Shield's The Stone Diaries in which limestone is proposed, with its accretions, its erosion and its impermanent permanence, as imagery for Prairie cultural and geological history.
A total of ten authors have been shortlisted for the award, with the other nominees named as Chris Abani, Nadeem Aslam, Jonathan Coe, Jens Christian Grondahl, Yasmina Khadra, Vyvyane Loh and Thomas Wharton.
Kaye's "The Tantalizing Possiblity of Living on the Plains"; Claire Omhovere's The Melting of Time in Thomas Wharton's Icefields"; Nina van Gessel's "Autogeology: Limestone and Life Narrative in Carol Shields's The Stone Diaries"; Heidi Slettedahl MacPherson's "Coyote as Culprit: 'Her-story' and the Feminist Fantastic in Gail Anderson-Dargatz's The Cure for Death by Lightning"; Russell Morton Brown's "Robert Kroetsch, Marshall McLuhan, and Canada's Prairie Postmodernism: The Aberhart Effect"; S.