Thomas of Erceldoune


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Thomas of Erceldoune

(ûr`səldo͞on'), fl. 1220?–1297?, Scottish seer and poet, also known as Thomas the Rhymer and Thomas Learmont. Evidence of his existence is founded on the mention of his name in documents of the 13th cent. Soon after his death his reputation as a prophet became proverbial. His reputed sayings were consulted as late as the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745. He supposedly predicted the battle of Bannockburn and the accession of James VI to the English throne. The poetical romance of Thomas and the Elf-Queen, attributed to him but actually composed about 1400, describes the events surrounding his receipt of the gift of prophecy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two more short essays follow, one on the Maginogion (and Sir Orfeo and Thomas of Erceldoune once these were added), asking students to write on a single theme from early fantasy using all texts, and one on The Lord of the Rings asking them to connect passages to earlier texts.
The final essay, by Helen Cooper, deals with the legend of Thomas of Erceldoune and his prophecies, and highlights the significance of its numerous rewritings, most notably in The Faerie Queene.
The consideration in this chapter of one such power with fairy associations, namely prophecy, is particularly revealing of the Renaissance writers' indebtedness to their medieval forebears and shows how the supernatural discourse of prophecies, such as the fourteenth-century Romance and Prophecies of Thomas of Erceldoune, acquired different political overtones in new historical circumstances.
The Manual lists manuscripts of The First Scottish Prophecy under the John of Bridlington's prophecies, but other authorities, such as Merlin, Thomas of Erceldoune, and St Thomas Becket, are also credited in the various manuscripts.