Thomism


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Thomism

 

the collected teachings of Thomas Aquinas and the school of Catholic philosophy that he founded. Thomism represented an attempt to apply Aristotelian principles to the demands of Christian dogma. It was the predominant trend in Scholasticism in the 13th century, more widely followed than Augustinian Platonism and Averroism. In the 14th century it found a rival in the philosophy of William of Ockham. In the 16th century, however, Thomism experienced a renascence during the period of the “second Scholasticism” (see).

References in periodicals archive ?
The detailed survey of the various versions of Thomism is set against an attempt to analyze the general nature of the Thomist-Scotist dispute over the pure potentiality of prime matter.
The announcement of this return coincided with the publication of his new book, The Joyful Mystery: Field Notes Toward a Green Thomism (Emmaus Road, 2017).
readers simply identify, and dismiss, Thomism as Catholicism, a category
All of us young people, even unbelievers, had been taking an interest in Thomism. This was largely as a result of Eliot's own initiative; and what we knew of it was derived from the works of Jacques Maritain, which were largely the source, I suspect, of Eliot's own knowledge.
These two convictions define in a nutshell the spirit of Thomism. They are also the reason that Thomism is such a fruitful framework for thinking through the things that call for thought in our own times.
In addition to original Thomism, Leo adopts the transfer theory of power from the sixteenth century neo-Scholastic, Francisco Suarez, in his understanding of the forms of government.
Catholic education has historically embraced the liberal arts through the philosophy of Thomism (MacIntyre, 2001), and hence inherits a philosophical framework permitting such institutions to embrace an internship program within a degree program in communication and rhetorical studies without the danger of specialization, a concern of many educators in the liberal arts (Fritz et al., 2005).
<< In these latter times, it is often suggested that Thomism lost its hegemony at Vatican II, and that efforts to revive it are counter-revolutionary.
The last forty years have seen the end of the hegemony of Thomism in the Catholic Church and the rediscovery of Thomas outside of Catholic circles.
Under the influence of Leon Bloy, the two were converted to Catholicism in 1906 and experienced what one might also describe as a conversion to Thomism in 1910.
1225-74) and was deeply influenced by modern interpreters of Thomism such as Pierre Rousselot (1878-1915) and Joseph Marechal (1878-1944).
Francis and his followers; the 13th-century Sicilian school of poets, who created the sonnet and canzone from Provencal forms and who were the first poets in Italy to use the vernacular; and the philosophical doctrines of Thomism, Aristotelianism, and Platonism, with which all the stilnovisti had contact.