Thomism

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Thomism

 

the collected teachings of Thomas Aquinas and the school of Catholic philosophy that he founded. Thomism represented an attempt to apply Aristotelian principles to the demands of Christian dogma. It was the predominant trend in Scholasticism in the 13th century, more widely followed than Augustinian Platonism and Averroism. In the 14th century it found a rival in the philosophy of William of Ockham. In the 16th century, however, Thomism experienced a renascence during the period of the “second Scholasticism” (see).

References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, O'Connor frequently wrote that her creative vision began with the Incarnation, believing with other Thomists of the era that Christ's submersion into history had transformed the entire nature of being, investing creation with radical new meaning (O'Connor 74, 230-231, 296).
From the Thomist perspective, the very idea that the social question is to be solved by strengthening the absolute power of the state is highly presumptuous and imprudent.
The application of Aquinas' moderate metaphysical realism to art may have seemed an auspicious project for the self-styled ontological critic, but the overlap of the Thomist revival and the rise of literary criticism did not end there.
Maritain, like Eliot, wished to defend the reality of ideas and especially the significant reality of language from its modern detractors, and so in his copious writings on metaphysics, epistemology, and semiotics, Maritain takes the one intellectual step the young Eliot could not and the one step necessary in the Thomist system.
The successful revival of Thomism was evident in Catholic universities around the world, in particular in the faculties of theology and philosophy, and in the publication of important journals of Scholastic philosophy such as The New Scholasticism, The Modern Schoolman, and The Thomist.
Braun's study is the first step in this new excavation of Mariana, and he opens the way for those who want to understand how and why a sixteenth-century Spanish, Thomist Jesuit came up with a legalistic theory of tyrannicide.
A good Aristotelian or Thomist would say that since we can only know the nature of a thing by its operations, properties and accidents, we must overlook the fact that we know Steve is composed of synthetic parts, and insist that he is still ensouled.
Gragnolati's achievement here is not only to redress the imbalance in Nardi's anti-Thomist reading, but also to qualify the enthusiasm of the Thomists by pointing out how Dante differs from Aquinas.
Although it had originally been called the International Thomist Society, it was preferred to replace the epithet Thomist with that of Thomas Aquinas.
Ironically, despite his profound mistake of treating the existence of God as philosophical problem in Thomas, it was Gilson's insistence on the study of Aquinas's writings in their historical context that was crucial in breaking through the carapace of Thomist tradition.
It will stimulate discussion, modify existing interpretations, and lead historians, ethicists, and political theorists to a new appreciation of the scope and originality of the Thomist synthesis.
On the other hand, when it detracts from an internally cohesive interpretation of Thomist principles, such as the teaching about tyrannicide, it is dismissed (p.