Thomson scattering


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Thomson scattering

[′täm·sən ‚skad·ə·riŋ]
(electromagnetism)
Scattering of electromagnetic radiation by free (or very loosely bound) charged particles, computed according to a classical nonrelativistic theory: energy is taken away from the primary radiation as the charged particles accelerated by the transverse electric field of the radiation, radiate in all directions.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thomson scattering intervenes between photons having much lower energies compared to the mass energy of the particle [6-8].
In Thomson scattering, the scattered photon energy is left at the same level, and an increase of the scattered photon energy is obtained in the photon-particle interaction of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect.
Giudicotti, "Complete calibration of a Thomson scattering spectrometer system by rotational Raman scattering in [H.sub.2]," Applied Optics, vol.
In the classical theory for Thomson scattering, electron spins are not considered, and a linearly polarized incident wave remains to be linearly polarized even after it is scattered by an electron.
Moreover, because Thomson scattering by an electron is frequency independent [51, p.
In 1946, Chandrashekhar, through mathematical consideration of Thomson scattering by electrons [40, p.
As Klaas Vogel, market development manager for Agilent Technologies' Acqiris Operation, described it, "Two features of Thomson scattering make it a particularly attractive measurement technique.
Further, the theoretical scattering cross sections were calculated by a numerical integration in intervals of 0.01[degrees] using form factor and incoherent scattering functions along with the Thomson scattering cross section and Klein-Nishina cross sections in the integrand, respectively (see Hubbell et al.
Fiaz Khan, Laser- Produced Copper Ion Energy Spectrum Employing Thomson Scattering Technique", Laser Physics, 17, 3, 282285 (2007).