thoracic vertebrae

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thoracic vertebrae

[thə′ras·ik ′vərd·ə‚brā]
(anatomy)
The vertebrae associated with the chest and ribs in vertebrates; there are 12 in humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Exhibit 3-19: Growth, Thoracic Spine & Deformity Procedures by Country, 2017-2022
Freehand pedicle screw placement in the thoracic spine is considered both safe and effective and routinely performed by many spine surgeons.6 However based on each surgeon' straining and individual preferences there is no one single or uniform technique and considerable variations exist among studies that may not provide easily reproducible parameters.
They address the most common pathologies affecting the thoracic spine, including degenerative, traumatic, oncological, and congenital diseases.
Proximal junctional kyphosis and clinical outcomes in adult spinal deformity surgery with fusion from the thoracic spine to the sacrum: a comparison of proximal and distal upper instrumented vertebrae.
A strong mobile thoracic spine is important because it plays a key role in the quality of your posture and good posture can help prevent injury, Ms Scales explained.
Secondly, the pathology occurred in the thoracic spine, which is a less common site for IVD and calcified IVD.
Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracic spine. Evaluation of asymptomatic individuals.
There is one case report of juxtaposition of intradural schwannoma and extradural cavernous hemangioma of the thoracic spine (55).
Victory sealed a wonderful comeback for the 29-year-old, who suffered a fractured thoracic spine when crashing on the cobbles in April's Paris-Roubaix and had to spend six weeks off his bike.
"He passed an MRI examination of the brain, lumbar and thoracic spine on August 7.
And if the client has a thoracic scoliotic curve in the opposite direction--in other words, a curve of right lateral flexion (termed left scoliotic curve for the convexity on the left)--it is even more likely that the thoracic spine will absorb the stretch and move into right lateral flexion, preventing the stretch from occurring in the lumbar region (Figure 4B).
Although necks are broken too, the most common fractures of the spine occur in the midback (or thoracic spine) and the lower back (lumbar spine) or in-between, the so-called thoraco-lumbar area.

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