speech balloon

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speech balloon

A graphic element taken from comic books that is widely used to convey messages in all forms of publications, including websites. The balloon is a bubble filled with text that points to a person or human-like object. Also called "speech bubbles," "voice bubbles," "word balloons" and "text balloons."


Speech Bubbles
If the text is meant to be silent, the bubble's pointer consists of smaller bubbles. Loud screams and shouts are exaggerated with jagged edges.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first four figures have thought balloons over their heads that read, "Eat, survive, reproduce." The final balloon, over the man's head, reads, "What does it all mean?" Our genes are interested only in replicating themselves, so evolution has designed us, and all other living things, with that goal in mind.
I gave him a lot of thought balloons, where the reader could read his thoughts, and that hadn't really been done in comics and I think that made people think they understood him, they cared about him, they related to him and sympathised with him.'
The most photographed corner is a wall with neon-lit thought balloons. Guests frequently pose in front of the thought balloons to mimic cartoon strips.
This lively, visual text for readers who already understand algebra features bite-sized chunks of facts and explanations sandwiched between b&w illustrations and photos, thought balloons, and panel discussions between different geometric shapes, as well as exercises, brain teasers, and projects.
With a funk sensibility that connects her to the indigenous art of her native Chicago, as well as to Guston and Crumb, she has created her own, Pop-inspired universe swarming with forms resembling Mickey Mouse ears, Dagwood shoes, thought balloons, and domestic objects that morph into illegibility.
Much of the play's humor comes in asides addressed to the audience that act sort of like cartoon thought balloons. It's to the credit of the actors that this never seems a mere comic contrivance.
While eager to meet a new production chief, one could almost see the thought balloons over industryites' heads: Placeholder.
Early in Hakansson's career, the will to make nature speak resulted in simple, almost childish installations, such as Help, help, help me!, 1992, which consisted of plants with thought balloons containing cries for help, or videos like Explanation, 1993, in which a rabbit, jumping up and down, uses incomprehensible sign language in an attempt to interpret the rest of the artworks in the show.