Thraso


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Thraso

swaggering but foolish soldier. [Rom. Lit.: The Eunuch]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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"What means did you employ?" was the question asked of the wife of Concini, in regard to her treatment of Mary of Medici; and the answer was, "Only that influence which every strong mind has over a weak one." Cannot Caesar in irons shuffle off the irons and transfer them to the person of Hippo or Thraso the turnkey?
Boughner terms this last trait 'the braggart conceived as pedagogue', and (mistakenly) traces it back to Terence's Thraso. (57) Sir Tophas revels in pseudo-erudition, telling Dares, 'Learned?
& Johnson, 1997 X "Thecla" asa (Hewitson, 1873) X X Theritas hemon ( Cramer, 1775) X X Theritas crines Druce, 1907 X Theritas mavors (Hubner, 1818) X HESPERIIDAE Achlyodes busirus (Cramer, 1779) X X Achlyodespallida (Felder, 1869) X X X Achlyodes mithridates thraso (Hubner (1807)) X X Anastrus sempiternus (Butler & Druce) X Arotis derassa ssp.
Elderton, for example, accuses Camell of misreading Cato, whilst Churchyard and Camell, in a peculiar echo of Bale's Brefe apologye, alternately style each other 'Gnato' and 'Thraso', insults that seek to advertise their erudition (Churchyard, Replicacion; Camell, Reioindre).
At the start of the play, Thais sends Phaedria to the country because she means to accept from another admirer, the braggart soldier Thraso, another gift, a slave called Pamphila whom she has recognized as her foster sister and a free citizen of Athens.
The plot of the play revolves around a contest between two lovers, Phaedria and the soldier Thraso, for the love of the courtesan, Thais.
Probably Menander's Simo made his first entrance from his house on the way to the market-place.(13) Vagueness over the off-stage action has also been noted in connection with other characters attested as Terentian introductions, Charinus and Byrria in the Andria, Thraso, Gnatho, and Antipho in the Eunuchus,(14) and characters probably introduced by Terence into extra scenes, Antipho in the central section of the Phormio, Parmeno in the finale of the Hecyra.(15) It should be emphasized that to recognize loose ends left by Terence's changes is not to condemn them; it is necessary also to recognize the positive dramatic gains which Terence achieved in return.
Hesperiidae Hesperiinae Saliana triangularis (Kaye, 1914) Hesperiidae Hesperiinae Synapte silius (Latreille, [1824]) Hesperiidae Pierinae Pyrgus communis (Grote, 1872) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Achlyodes mithridates thraso (Hubner, [1807]) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Antigonus erosus (Hubner, [1812]) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Antigonus nearchus (Latreille, [1817]) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Astraptes anaphus (Cramer, 1777) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Astraptes fulgerator (Walch, 1775) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Astraptes talus (Cramer, 1777) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Autochton neis (Geyer, 1832) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Autochton zarex (Hubner, 1818) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Bungalotis midas (Cramer, 1775) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Burca sp.
26] the name seemed typical of matrons, just as Pamphilus seemed typical of youths and Thraso of soldiers).