Thraso


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Thraso

swaggering but foolish soldier. [Rom. Lit.: The Eunuch]
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References in classic literature ?
Cannot Caesar in irons shuffle off the irons and transfer them to the person of Hippo or Thraso the turnkey?
Boughner terms this last trait 'the braggart conceived as pedagogue', and (mistakenly) traces it back to Terence's Thraso.
amp; Johnson, 1997 X "Thecla" asa (Hewitson, 1873) X X Theritas hemon ( Cramer, 1775) X X Theritas crines Druce, 1907 X Theritas mavors (Hubner, 1818) X HESPERIIDAE Achlyodes busirus (Cramer, 1779) X X Achlyodespallida (Felder, 1869) X X X Achlyodes mithridates thraso (Hubner (1807)) X X Anastrus sempiternus (Butler & Druce) X Arotis derassa ssp.
6) Thais is approached by the drunken young man Chremes, and she encourages him to stand up manfully against the soldier Thraso, who is approaching her house with a gang of retainers in an attempt to snatch back a girl whom Chremes loves.
the prostitute] began speaking recklessly (as you might expect when drunk) with the young man Chremes, and prepared herself to stand up manfully to Thraso.
At the start of the play, Thais sends Phaedria to the country because she means to accept from another admirer, the braggart soldier Thraso, another gift, a slave called Pamphila whom she has recognized as her foster sister and a free citizen of Athens.
This occurs when a conversation between Thais and Thraso is interrupted by Phaedria's manservant, who explains that he has come to present her with his master's gifts.
On les retrouve dans le passage du De orthographia oo Cassiodore utilise Priscien (GL 7, 208, 4-8: Adspiratio ante uocales omnes poni potest; post consonantes autem quattuor tantummodo ponitur, c t p r, ut habeo Herennius heros hiems homo humus Chremes Thraso Philippus Rhodus.
Phaedria sends as a gift an old slave-woman and an equally old eunuch, while Thraso sends as a gift the beautiful serving maid Pamphilia.
13) Vagueness over the off-stage action has also been noted in connection with other characters attested as Terentian introductions, Charinus and Byrria in the Andria, Thraso, Gnatho, and Antipho in the Eunuchus,(14) and characters probably introduced by Terence into extra scenes, Antipho in the central section of the Phormio, Parmeno in the finale of the Hecyra.
Hesperiidae Hesperiinae Saliana triangularis (Kaye, 1914) Hesperiidae Hesperiinae Synapte silius (Latreille, [1824]) Hesperiidae Pierinae Pyrgus communis (Grote, 1872) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Achlyodes mithridates thraso (Hubner, [1807]) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Antigonus erosus (Hubner, [1812]) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Antigonus nearchus (Latreille, [1817]) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Astraptes anaphus (Cramer, 1777) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Astraptes fulgerator (Walch, 1775) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Astraptes talus (Cramer, 1777) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Autochton neis (Geyer, 1832) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Autochton zarex (Hubner, 1818) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Bungalotis midas (Cramer, 1775) Hesperiidae Pyrginae Burca sp.
26] the name seemed typical of matrons, just as Pamphilus seemed typical of youths and Thraso of soldiers).