Thrasybulus


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Thrasybulus

(thrăs'əbyo͞o`ləs), d. c.389 B.C., Athenian statesman. A strong supporter of the democratic and anti-Spartan party, he successfully opposed (411 B.C.) the oligarchical Four Hundred and later had AlcibiadesAlcibiades
, c.450–404 B.C., Athenian statesman and general. Of the family of Alcmaeonidae, he was a ward of Pericles and was for many years a devoted attendant of Socrates. He turned to politics after the Peace of Nicias (421 B.C.
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 recalled. In the Peloponnesian War he fought at Cyzicus (410; now in Turkey) and Arginusae (406). Banished by the Thirty TyrantsThirty Tyrants,
oligarchy of ancient Athens (404–403 B.C.). It was created by Lysander under Spartan auspices after the Peloponnesian War. Critias and Theramenes were prominent members. It was overthrown at Piraeus (now Piraiévs) by Thrasybulus.
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, he obtained the help of exiles in Thebes, marched with his force from Phyle to Piraeus, and overthrew (403) the Thirty. He was leading a campaign in a new war against Sparta when the excesses of his troops so outraged the citizens of Aspendus (now in Turkey) that they murdered him.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Thrasybulus

 

Died 388 B.C. Athenian military commander and political figure during the Peloponnesian War (431–404 B.C.).

Thrasybulus was the leader of a democratic faction in Athens. In 411 B.C., he took command in the struggle against the oligarchical regime of the Thirty Tyrants, as a result of which democracy was restored in late 404 B.C. In 389–388, while in command of the Athenian Navy, he established Athenian influence and democratic regimes in Thrace, on the Aegean islands, and in the Greek cities of Asia Minor.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(30) "The evil has grown so much that it is no longer a question of using painkillers, but rather cautery and incisions: even then it is to be feared that the whole will rot away, so rooted is the evil." The pseudonym Thrasibule Phenice can perhaps be understood in a number of ways: Thrasybulus was the name of both a clever Milesian tyrant, cited by Herodotus, and an Athenian naval commander who shared in the democratic victories over the Four Hundred and the Thirty Tyrants.
The period he covers offers ample scope for drama, including as it does the disastrous expedition against Sicily, the temporary suspension of the Athenian democracy under the rule of the Four Hundred, the complex military, political, and diplomatic stratagems that attended the subsequent shift of the theatre of operations to the eastern Aegean, Athens' final defeat, the bloody reign of the Thirty, the restoration of democracy under Thrasybulus, and the death of Socrates.
(20.) The city certainly did bestow one crown in the fifth century (accepting a restoration) in the theater: that awarded to Thrasybulus for his role in the assassination of Phrynichus (see IG [i.sup.2] 110 Meiggs and Lewis 85).
He observed that "[t]he history of amnesty dates back to 404 B.C., when Thrasybulus, an Athenian general, forbade any punishment of Athenian citizens for political acts committed before the expulsion of the tyrants." Id.
Theseus' metaphor suggests another Herodotean passage as well, the famous lesson of Thrasybulus, who, by his wanton destruction of a rich field of grain,(64) taught Periander the art of monarchy.
The maner of gouernement or policie of the realme of England (London: Gregorie Seton, 1583), ch.7, mentions neither the platonic interpretation of the tyrant's psychology nor Hiero, although he tacitly cites Xenophon's Hellenica by referring to Thrasybulus and the Thirty Tyrants.
The meaning 'foretold' is assured by the immediately preceding information that the man in question was 'the Elian seer Thrasybulus'.(27) Plutarch writes at Sulla 27.6 ([Phi] [Eta] [Sigma] [Iota] [Nu]) [Greek Words Omitted] ('which also happened on the day that the man had foretold').
Herodotus (5.92[Zeta]f.) has Thrasybulus of Miletus, when he was asked by Periander the safest way of controlling Corinth, vividly advise him to cut down those who were eminent like the outstanding ears of corn; which was indeed an apt metaphor.