Three Princes of Serendip

Three Princes of Serendip

always make discoveries by accident. [Br. Lit.: Three Princes of Serendip]
See: Chance

Three Princes of Serendip

adventures of three Ceylonese princes who continually discover things they are not looking for. [Persian Lit.: Benét, 915]
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The word serendipity was coined by Horace Walpole, an English art historian and man of letters, after reading a Persian fairy tale about three princes of Serendip (now Sri Lanka) who traveled the world "making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of.
The origin of the word is said to stem from a 16th century European fairy tale, The Three Princes of Serendip, in which the heroes were always making discoveries by accident, and was first used in 1754 by the then Prime Minister, Horace Walpole.
In a letter to his good friend Horace Mann, Walpole recounted this excerpt from a fairy tale, The Travels and Adventures of Three Princes of Serendip (the name for ancient Sri Lanka): " .
For example, I sometimes give a history of the word serendipity: "The Three Princes of Serendip went out searching for treasure.
The word is a takeoff from Horace Walpole's book, The Three Princes of Serendip.
The 18th century author Horace Walpole invented this word, based on a Persian tale: "The Three Princes of Serendip.
THE word was coined in 1754 by Horace Walpole after The Three Princes of Serendip, the old name of Sri Lanka formerly known as Ceylon.
It was coined by Horace Walpole after the characters in the fairy tale, The Three Princes of Serendip.
Drawn from Horace Walpole's The Three Princes of Serendip, "serendipity" stems from the facility of the three heroes to make, by virtue of accident and sagacity, happy and unexpected discoveries.
In the English translation of The Three Princes of Serendip of Kushrau, by Habi [1927], one of the princes discovered that a king had 'a butler's blood in his veins'.