Three-Toed Woodpecker


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Three-Toed Woodpecker

 

(Picoides tridactylus), a bird of the family Picidae. The body length is approximately 22 cm. The feet have three toes, and the bill is relatively slender. The dorsal side of the body is black with white, while the ventral side ranges from pure white to very mottled with black markings. The crest is golden yellow in the male, white in the female. The three-toed woodpecker is distributed in the forest zone of Europe, Asia, and North America. The bird keeps to humid coniferous forests of fir and spruce, cedar, and larch, avoiding pine forests; it is often found in scorched areas with many dead trees. It is very beneficial, as it feeds on insects, especially bark beetles and their larvae.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
By mid century, the park's climate is projected to improve for birds that live in dry forests at mid elevation, like the western tanager, pygmy nuthatch, and red-naped sapsucker, and worsen for birds in cooler, wetter, high-elevation forests, like the American three-toed woodpecker, pine grosbeak, and Townsend's solitaire.
Genetic or social polyandry ([greater than or equal to]1 male, 1 female) has been reported in many other woodpecker species (for example, Lesser Spotted Woodpecker [Dendrocopos minor; Rossmanith and others 2006]; Great Spotted Woodpecker [Dendrocopos major; Kotaka 1998]; Northern Flicker [Colaptes auratus; Wiebe 2002]; Acorn Woodpecker [Joste and others 1985; Koenig and others 1984]; West Indian Woodpecker [Melanerpes superciliaris; Willimont and others 1991]), including the Eurasian Three-toed Woodpecker (Pechacek and others 2005, 2006), which is closely related to the Black-backed Woodpecker (Fuchs and Pons 2015).
The state's two rarest woodpeckers--the three-toed woodpecker and the black-backed woodpecker (pictured on page 24)--depend on forest fires to keep their populations healthy.
Therefore, they are concordant with phylogeographic studies of the three-toed woodpecker (Picoides tridactylus, Zink et al.
Breeding performance, natal dispersal and nest site fidelity of three-toed woodpecker in the German Alps.
I don't think any birdwatcher would want one, though last night at sunset I had a great homed owl fly under my stand and earlier I'd had a ladder-backed, three-toed woodpecker nearly perch on my ear.
Ornithologist Bob Eng, a retired Montana State University professor, says he has birded in Montana his entire career and had only observed one three-toed woodpecker. The summer after the fires, he recorded 30 sightings in Yellowstone in a single day.
The area's critter list includes bighorn sheep, deer, pine marten, goshawk, elk, northern three-toed woodpecker, black bear, cougar, and peregrine falcon.
Although each ancient hemlock, if harvested, would yield many board-feet of wood, Childs has left them in place, largely because snags of his giant hemlocks harbor the migratory Arctic three-toed woodpecker that is rarely seen south of the St.
In Oregon, biologists are studying bald eagle nesting and three-toed woodpecker habitat.