threshold

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threshold

1. Psychol the strength at which a stimulus is just perceived
2. 
a. the minimum intensity or value of a signal, etc., that will produce a response or specified effect
b. (as modifier): a threshold current
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Threshold

A strip fastened to the floor beneath a door, to cover the joint where two types of floor materials meet or to provide weather protection.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

What does it mean when you dream about a threshold?

A threshold is a symbol for passing from one state or condition to the next, indicating a transition in some aspect of the dreamer’s life.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

threshold

[′thresh‚hōld]
(building construction)
A piece of stone, wood, or metal that lies under an outside door.
(electronics)
In a modulation system, the smallest value of carrier-to-noise ratio at the input to the demodulator for all values above which a small percentage change in the input carrier-to-noise ratio produces a substantially equal or smaller percentage change in the output signal-to-noise ratio.
(engineering)
The least value of a current, voltage, or other quantity that produces the minimum detectable response in an instrument or system.
(geology)
(mathematics)
A logic operator such that, if P, Q, R, S, … are statements, then the threshold will be true if at least N statements are true, false otherwise.
(physics)
The minimum level of some input quantity needed for some process to take place, such as a threshold energy for a reaction, or the minimum level of pumping at which a laser can go into self-excited oscillation.
(physiology)
The minimum level of a stimulus that will evoke a response in an irritable tissue.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

threshold

1. A strip fastened to the floor beneath a door, usually required to cover the joint where two types of floor material meet; may provide weather protection at exterior doors. Also See doorsill.
2. In illumination engineering, the value of physical stimulus which permits an object to be seen a specified percentage of the time with specified accuracy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

threshold

threshold
The beginning of that portion of the runway usable for landing (ICAO). On instrument runways, it is indicated by long stripes followed by the runway designation marking. The number of stripes is dependent on the width of the runway.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

threshold

(1) The point at which a signal (voltage, current, etc.) is perceived as valid.

(2) (Threshold) The code name for Windows 10.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
With respect to discrimination of COPD-related events, the investigators found no significant difference between the optimal fixed threshold (0.71; C-statistic, 0.696) and the 0.70 threshold (difference, 0.001; 95 percent confidence interval, −0.002 to 0.004); however, the optimal fixed threshold was more accurate than the lower limit of normal threshold (difference, 0.034; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.028 to 0.041).
Multichannel sellers also need to determine how marketplace facilitator laws interact with the seller's economic nexus thresholds. Typically, thresholds are based on in-state sales through all channels, but some exceptions may arise if the seller makes sales only through marketplace facilitators that collect the applicable sales or use tax in the state.
Hearing thresholds obtained by click ABR and ASSR (mean threshold at 1, 2 and 4 kHz) and chirp ABR and ASSR (mean threshold at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz) were compared within each category of degree of hearing loss.
Under Memorandum Circular 18-001, the PCC is mandated to conduct an annual adjustment of the thresholds based on the nominal GDP growth of the previous year rounded up to the nearest hundred millions.
PCC said the revised thresholds do not apply to MandAs pending review, notifiable transactions consummated before March 1, and transactions already subject of a decision by the antitrust body.
"The annual adjustment based on nominal GDP growth ensures that the thresholds maintain their real value over time and relative to the size of the economy," he added.
Thresholds was part of the wider summer-long Developed in Birmingham season of events and exhibitions telling the story of the city's importance in photographic history.
This allows an easy application of DFSS principles to the setting of thresholds. If the threshold is set anywhere inside the shaded area in Figure 2.
For food in particular, here are the average monthly food thresholds (rounded) of the poor for the pooled 2016 NCR sample, by size of family: one person, P5,400; two persons, P7,000; three persons, P8,500; four persons, P9,000; five persons, P10,800; six persons, P11,100; seven persons, P10,700; eight persons, P11,700; nine persons, P11,900; and 10+ persons, P9,500.
Displaced thresholds have distinct markings to clearly show where the landing portion of the runway begins when it differs from where the pavement itself actually starts.