Thule Culture

Thule Culture

 

an Eskimo culture that existed between A.D. 900 and 1700 along both shores of the Bering Strait and the arctic coastline, as well as on the Canadian islands and, from the 11th century, in Greenland. The culture was named after Thule, a settlement in Greenland.

The tribes of the Thule culture hunted whale, seal, walrus, and land animals. Characteristic Thule findings include whaling harpoons and flat toggle-type harpoon heads made of bone; linear designs were used in decorations. In the central part of the American arctic region, the eastern Thule culture, as it is called, is distinguished by circular dwellings made of stone and whalebone, the use of harnessed dog teams, stone lamps, snow knives, and figurines representing people, animals, and waterfowl. In the Bering Strait region, what is known as the western Thule culture is characterized by dwellings made of driftwood, weapons, and sinkers.

REFERENCE

Bandi, H. G. Urgeschichte der Eskimo. Stuttgart, 1965.
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That later band of immigrants spread their Thule culture across Alaska, northern Canada and Greenland and served as the ancestors of present-day Inuits, says a team led by paleogeneticists Maanasa Raghavan and Eske Willerslev, both of the University of Copenhagen.
Caption: Alaskans who made wooden dolls such as this one 400 to 500 years ago descended from members of the Thule culture, which arrived in the New World over 1,000 years ago.
The oldest exhibit will almost certainly prove to be a fossilised walrus ivory effigy of a shaman, dating some time between 1000-1400 and from the Eskimo Early Thule Culture (Galerie Meyer).
Chapter 3 presents the results of the dietary study of the Greenlandic Thule culture, which is not only interesting in its own right but also essential for assessing Greenlandic Norse diet, as the Thule data provide a direct estimate of isotope signals from a population whose diet is entirely focused on wild animal resources.
There is a substantial density of settlements belonging to people of the Thule culture in their last period of settlement (c.
sediment cores from freshwater lakes, and located and surveyed 116 Palaeo-Eskimo and Thule culture sites in the study area (Kroon et al.
On the track of the Thule culture from Bering Strait to East Greenland; proceedings.
Looking at developments over the almost three decades since the last major conference on the Thule people, archaeologists and ethnohistorians address topics including the origins of the Thule culture; Thule settlement patterns and populations; the archaeology of specific Thule sites and the end of Thule culture and the transition into the modern period.
While Dorset people lived in the Canadian Arctic, the region around the Bering Strait and northern A1aska witnessed a separate sequence of cultural developments that produced the Thule culture.
The historically known Eskimo are representatives of the Thule culture which emerged about AD 1000.
Several of the distinctive cultural characteristics that most people today associate with Inuit first show up archaeologically in the Thule culture and its immediate antecedents, including the use of dog sleds, the extensive use of large and small skin boats and the open-water hunting of large sea mammals.
Knuth (1903-96) spent six decades exploring High Arctic Greenland, surveying and investigating archaeological sites, particularly associated with the Palaeo-Eskimo and Thule cultures.