Thule Culture

Thule Culture

 

an Eskimo culture that existed between A.D. 900 and 1700 along both shores of the Bering Strait and the arctic coastline, as well as on the Canadian islands and, from the 11th century, in Greenland. The culture was named after Thule, a settlement in Greenland.

The tribes of the Thule culture hunted whale, seal, walrus, and land animals. Characteristic Thule findings include whaling harpoons and flat toggle-type harpoon heads made of bone; linear designs were used in decorations. In the central part of the American arctic region, the eastern Thule culture, as it is called, is distinguished by circular dwellings made of stone and whalebone, the use of harnessed dog teams, stone lamps, snow knives, and figurines representing people, animals, and waterfowl. In the Bering Strait region, what is known as the western Thule culture is characterized by dwellings made of driftwood, weapons, and sinkers.

REFERENCE

Bandi, H. G. Urgeschichte der Eskimo. Stuttgart, 1965.
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From Middle Ages to colonial times: Archaeological and ethnohistorical studies of the Thule culture in south west Greenland 1300-1800 AD.
That later band of immigrants spread their Thule culture across Alaska, northern Canada and Greenland and served as the ancestors of present-day Inuits, says a team led by paleogeneticists Maanasa Raghavan and Eske Willerslev, both of the University of Copenhagen.
The oldest exhibit will almost certainly prove to be a fossilised walrus ivory effigy of a shaman, dating some time between 1000-1400 and from the Eskimo Early Thule Culture (Galerie Meyer).
Regardless of the unresolved issue of the nature and extent of Inuit-Norse contact, archaeologists seem to be of the opinion that there was no lasting influence on Thule culture beyond the introduction of small quantities of metal (McGhee 1982c, 1984).
On the development of whaling in the western Thule culture.
Looking at developments over the almost three decades since the last major conference on the Thule people, archaeologists and ethnohistorians address topics including the origins of the Thule culture; Thule settlement patterns and populations; the archaeology of specific Thule sites and the end of Thule culture and the transition into the modern period.
One of the earliest archaeological investigations of the commercial whaling era was George Sabo's (1979) application of the cultural ecology approach to trace the material culture changes associated with the development of the Thule culture in the historic period Artifacts recovered from five sites on the east coast of Baffin Island, occupied from the late 18th to the early 20th centuries, were classified according to their method and material of manufacture (traditional, European or blended) in order to evaluate the impact of European contact on cultural activities such as procurement, maintenance, manufacture and a category he termed 'other'.
Indeed, Mathiassen (1927), the first to identify and define Thule culture, included dog sleds as a key defining trait.
Current interpretations of Thule culture seal use at winter sites in Arctic Canada and Greenland tend to assume that seal carcasses were introduced intact to the sites during the winter.
provided the setting for the emergence of Early or Pioneering Thule culture (ca.
His efforts span from the earliest Palaeo-Eskimo cultures, over the fabled Dorset culture, to the whalers of the Thule culture.
And Karen Wittke, University of Toronto, will research changes in gender relations in prehistoric Thule culture society that resulted from the Thule migration out of northwestern Alaska.