Thurii


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Thurii

(thyo͞o`rēī), ancient city of Magna Graecia, S Italy, in Bruttium, on the Gulf of Tarentum (now Taranto). It was founded by Pericles in 443 B.C. to replace ruined Sybaris. New Greek colonists came, among them the city planner Hippodamus and possibly Herodotus and Lysias. Thurii became an ally of Rome and was pillaged (204 B.C.) by Hannibal. Rome revived (193 B.C.) the colony, but it did not thrive.
References in classic literature ?
From his brother Lysias we learn that he fell a victim to the Thirty Tyrants, but no allusion is here made to his fate, nor to the circumstance that Cephalus and his family were of Syracusan origin, and had migrated from Thurii to Athens.
So the Athenians, when they were founding their model new colony at Thurii, employed Hippodamus of Miletus, whom Aristotle mentions in Book II, as the best expert in town-planning, to plan the streets of the city, and Protagoras as the best expert in law-making, to give the city its laws.
fugitive slaves at Thurii shortly after Octavian's birth.
the great Athenian statesman who, it is said, asked the Sophist to draft a constitution for the Greek colony of Thurii in southern Italy.
To cite ([sections] 12), as proof of the hardship endured by the allied cities as the result of Alcibiades' tribute assessment, the detail that many of their members were migrating to Thurii is to suggest that mass migration could be induced by high tribute payments.
These aspects are the sophist's role as lawgiver for Pericles' colony of Thurii, his recorded discussion with the statesman on guilt associated with accidental death, and finally his political theory and Pericles' role therein.
Herodotus is thought to have resided in Athens and to have met Sophocles and then to have left for Thurii, a new colony in southern Italy sponsored by Athens.
Torjussen, 'The "Orphic-Pythagorean" eschatology of the Gold Tablets from Thurii and the Sixth Book of Virgil's Aeneid, SO 83 (2008) 68-83.
Alcibiades' ship accompanies the Salaminia back towards Athens, but he jumps ship at Thurii, after which he goes to Cyllene in Elis, thence to Sparta itself (6.
Under Tarentine leadership, that league was too weak to prevent one of its members, Thurii, from inviting the Romans into its territory in 285 B.
as soon as he left Thurii, [Alcibiades] fled to the Peloponnese, where, terrified at the violence of his enemies, he determined to abandon his country, and sent to Sparta demanding a safe asylum, on the strength of a promise that he would do the Spartans more good than he had in time past done them harm.