Thurii

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Thurii

(thyo͞o`rēī), ancient city of Magna Graecia, S Italy, in Bruttium, on the Gulf of Tarentum (now Taranto). It was founded by Pericles in 443 B.C. to replace ruined Sybaris. New Greek colonists came, among them the city planner Hippodamus and possibly Herodotus and Lysias. Thurii became an ally of Rome and was pillaged (204 B.C.) by Hannibal. Rome revived (193 B.C.) the colony, but it did not thrive.
References in periodicals archive ?
88) So it is that all groups of musicians called on to entertain in Shakespeare's plays do so on a casual basis: 'Sneak's Noise' in 2 Henry IV, Cassio's attempt at a serenade, those Peter sends away in Romeo and Juliet, those brought by Thurio to woo Silvia in Two Gentlemen of Verona, and those used by Cloten in Cymbeline, together with the players and their recorders in Hamlet.
Silvia's melodramatic inclinations led her to cry an impressively long wail before storming offstage just before her father said, "Sir Thurio, fear not bur that she will love you" (3.
Vissi D'Amore Boy, Thurio Don Stephenson Speed John Cariani Valentine Norm Lewis Proteus Oscar Isaac Julia Rosario Dawson Lucetta Megan Lawrence Launce David Costabile Vissi D'Amore Girl Kate Chapman Antonio Richard Ruiz Duke of Milan Mel Johnson Jr.
AE'R rhan fwyaf ohonom yn sgut am fargen neu ddwy, ac yn mwynhau tyrchu a thurio trwy hen greiriau.
Still Zubin Varla manages to make his mark as wonderfully stuffy suitor and super-snob Thurio.
All of these forms of address are used i n accord with the norm, except for a few cases of sir from Proteus to Speed and the emphatic regulating employment of the first name Thurio by the end of the play.
Valentine and Sylvia and the Duke and occasionally Lucetta were played by blacks; Launce was originally done in Yiddish, then went country-and-western in a cast change; Eglamour was Chinese, Thurio was an Irishman, Lucetta a Russian-Danish girl.
No loyalties deter him from betraying his friend's planned elopement to the duke, then deceiving the latter by trying to win the girl for himself while he pretends to be furthering the courtship of Sir Thurio.
The " two gentlemen " are Valentine and Proteus, close friends at first but later rivals for the hand of Silvia, daughter of the duke of Milan, who wants her to marry the foolish and cowardly Thurio.
Valentine says: "Sir Thurio borrows his wit from your ladyship's looks, and spends what he borrows kindly in your company" (2.
By contrast, all was gay and far fleshier at the Milanese country club, where Sylvia frolicked in white tennis shorts and her father, Thurio, and Valentine later stripped to the waist for a backrub as they discussed Sylvia's matrimonial fate.