Thurniaceae


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Thurniaceae

[‚thər·nē′ās·ē‚ē]
(botany)
A small family of monocotyledonous plants in the order Juncales distinguished by an inflorescence of one or more dense heads, vascular bundles of the leaf in vertical pairs, and silica bodies in the leaf epidermis.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Early embryo development in Cyperaceae conforms to the Juncus variation of the Onagrad-type and thus basically follows the same general pattern as that found in Juncaceae and Thurniaceae, the closest relatives of Cyperaceae (Johansen 1950; Davis 1966; Makde and Bhuskute 1987; Goetghebeur 1998).
Eight Juncaceae and one Thurniaceae were included as outgroup taxa based on currently accepted relationships within Poales (Givnish et al.
Las juncaceas fueron ubicadas por Cronquist (1981) en la subclase Commelinidae y el orden Juncales junto con Thurniaceae. Sin embargo, el uso de marcadores moleculares y de estudios con enfoque filogenetico han cambiado nuestra vision de la familia.
Los analisis filogeneticos han comprobado la monofilia de Juncaceae, una vez excluido Prionium, genero arbustivo monotipico del sur de Africa, y transferido finalmente a Thurniaceae (Munro y Linder, 1998).
As familias Typhaceae e Thurniaceae so ocorreram no rio Acara, nos maiores valores de condutividade eletrica do gradiente, enquanto Vitaceae e Convolvulaceae so ocorreram no outro extremo do gradiente, no rio Cuiuni (Figura 3 a).
Entretanto, a ordenacao das familias pelo gradiente de condutividade mostrou uma clara preferencia de varias familias por determinados valores de condutividade eletrica, como, por exemplo, Thyphaceae e Thurniaceae ocorrendo nos maiores valores de condutividade, e Vitaceae e Convolvulaceae ocorrendo no outro extremo do gradiente.
Epidermal, spherical (druse-like) silica bodies, similar to those of Kingia and Baxteria (Rudall & Chase 1996), occur in some Poales (Bromeliaceae, Cyperaceae, Rapateaceae, Thurniaceae).
Prionium (now included in Thurniaceae; APG 2003) has a typical juncaceous flower, which allowed to infer that Juncaceae are more similar to the common ancestor than the Cyperaceae (Simpson 1995).
Thurniaceae, in which they occur in other tissues, especially the
All taxa listed in Poales (Table I) have secretory tapeta, except for Sparganiaceae and Typhaceae (a sister pair, both plasmodial) and some "unknown" taxa, notably Hydatellaceae and Thurniaceae, for which more data are required.