Thyestes

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Related to Thyestean: Thyestean banquet

Thyestes

(thīĕs`tēz): see AtreusAtreus
, in Greek mythology, the son of Pelops and the father of Agamemnon and Menelaus. He vied with his brother Thyestes for the throne of Mycenae. When Thyestes seduced Atreus' wife, Aerope, in order to attain the golden ram whose possession signified kingship, Atreus, in
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Thyestes

cursed the house of Atreus, who had served him his sons in a stew. [Gk. Myth. & Drama: “Atreus,” Benét, 61]
See: Curse

Thyestes

unknowingly eats sons served by vengeful brother. [Rom. Lit.: Thyestes]
References in periodicals archive ?
See act 5 of Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus for a powerful example of the Thyestean banquet in Elizabethan revenge tragedies.
(1993:177) concludes that there is something of a 'Thyestean
Despite his colour-signature of 'reddish brown speckled', he proffers no Thyestean or Ariel-harpy banquet for our depraved taste.
But if we stretch the metaphor too far, the Thyestean feast in this final scene--the serving up of Julio to Piero--becomes a rather nasty parody of the paschal meal in Old Testament terms, or the Communion service in New Testament terms.
Hibbard rightly calls this a Thyestean banquet, following Nashe's own description of Christ's Tears as a Senecan tragedy.
In Empedoclean and Pythagorean thought animal sacrifice is tantamount to human sacrifice; Empedocles describes a father unwittingly sacrificing his metensomatized son in language that is close to the later Aeschylean account of the sacrifice of Iphigenia (B137).(25) The Empedoclean passage also suggests a feast such as that offered to Thyestes, in an earlier episode from the history of the Pelopids; when the Ovidian Pythagoras returns to his diatribe against meat-eating at the end of his speech, he makes the connection between his injunction and the doctrine of metempsychosis and inveighs against 'Thyestean tables' (15.462 'neue Thyesteis cumulemus uiscera mensis').