Tibullus


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Tibullus

(Albius Tibullus) (tĭbŭl`əs), c.55? B.C.–19 B.C., Roman elegiac poet, b. Pedum, near Praeneste. Probably of the equestrian order, he was a friend of Messala, whom he accompanied on campaign. A master of the Latin love elegy, Tibullus wrote two books of verse (concerned, respectively, with "Delia" and "Nemesis"—names symbolic of his loves) that were published during his lifetime; some doubtfully attributed posthumous pieces plus works by other poets constitute a third book.
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Tibullus

Albius . ?54--?19 bc, Roman elegiac poet
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Si tamen e nobis aliquid nisi nomen et umbra / restat, in Elysia ualle Tibullus erit.
1.8 and Priapus in Tibullus 1.4 "offer the most complete teachings of love in 'canonical' elegy," thus suggesting that in fact the Una is a better praeceptor anions than the lover-poet.
Volume 1 (9780865168299, $20.59, 341pp) by academician author of numerous pedagogical materials Marianthe Colakis is comprised of selections from Catullus, Cicero, Livy, Ovid, Propertius, Tibullus, and Vergil.
(134) The expression huic ampla quidem de sanguine prisco/nobilitas also recalls Tibullus writing about his patron, Messalla, nec quaeris quid quaque iudex sub imagine dicat/ sed generispriscos contendis uincere honores ('you do not ask what the judge under any bust says, but strive to outdo the ancient honours of your family', 3.8.30-31).
This is where a spring, like that of Vaucluse, runs and where, as the Italian Tibullus assures, herbs, flowers, zephyrs, birds, and Petrarch talked about love.
His text is heavily influenced by Tibullus 1.5, however, in relation to both form and content (Catullus, Tibullus, Pervigilium Veneris.
131-132), her action anticipates that of Delia in Rossetti's The Return of Tibullus to Delia (c.1853), studies for which were made in 1851.
(18) Catullus 1 (cui dono) appeals to a patrona virgo (line 9) for the continued existence (11.9-10) of his lepidum novum libellum; Tibullus' Book 1.1 addresses a list of typical Roman mythological beings (Ceres, Priapus, the Lares, Roman gods in general) to support the labours described in his first poem and by implication his entire poetic effort; Propertius' Book 1.1 addresses his friend Tullus, but the influence of the mythological world of Amor and Venus is paramount.
This assumption of superiority, of moral duty underpinned the education of the governing class, with classics at its core, not the classics of the angry young men like Juvenal, Catullus or Tibullus, but of the establishment, Virgil, Horace, Cicero, Caesar, who might almost be described as English gentlemen by adoption.
It reminded me of Apollinaire's essay on surprise in poetry, which I recently enlisted to connect Propertius's and Tibullus's poetry to yours.