Tientsin French-Chinese Treaty of 1858

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tientsin French-Chinese Treaty of 1858

 

an agreement imposed on China by France during the Opium War of 1856–60. Signed in Tientsin on June 27, the treaty granted France the same privileges that were accorded to Great Britain under the Tientsin Anglo-Chinese Treaty of 1858. In addition, it called for the opening of the ports of Nanking and Tanshui on Taiwan, acknowledged the right of French missionaries to propagate the Christian faith in China, and required the Chinese to pay an indemnity of two million taels.

REFERENCE

Treaties Between the Empire of China and Foreign Powers, 4th ed. Edited by W. F. Mayers. Shanghai, 1902.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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