Tight buildings

Tight buildings

Buildings that are designed to let in minimal infiltration air in order to reduce heating and cooling energy costs. In actuality, buildings typically exhibit leakage that is on the same order as required ventilation; however, this leakage is not well distributed and cannot serve as a substitute for proper ventilation.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Smart fans update a long-established technology, and have the potential to both save energy and offer comfort in today's air tight buildings," says Kevin Powell, Director of the Green Proving Ground Program.
On a number of job sites, customers value the small size of these machines and their maneuverability characteristics to get in and around tight buildings.
However, as was learned, tight buildings without properly designed ventilation and conditioning systems can lead to "sick buildings' and poor indoor air quality.
General heat recovery capabilities when linked to the ventilation-exhaust systems bring us full circle to our discussion of tight buildings needing good ventilation.
More and more, people are living in tight buildings with wall-to-wall carpets and double glazing.
While tight buildings keep poor interior air in, they also protect the interior from contaminated exterior air.
But there were no tight buildings, power was cheap and nobody knew there was going to be a problem with the ozone layer.
Domesticated rabbits and chickens, especially young ones, should be kept in tight buildings and when outside, good fences are important.
Combined with an activated carbon impregnated media, Zeozorb-Plus is effective for HVAC filtration in air tight buildings, print rooms and laboratories.
Nevertheless, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, tight buildings where the ventilation is inadequate may contain indoor pollutants at various levels-whether people are happy with their jobs or not.
However, smart building management has come a long way "from the original tight buildings of the 1970s," notes Chris Pesek, director of integrated facilities management at Jones Lang LaSalle (JLL), a professional services and investment management firm.
Today, tight buildings, less windows, solid roof decks, and the addition of roof deck insulation has reduced ventilation from its once natural functional state.