Tiglath-pileser III


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Tiglath-pileser III

known as Pulu. died ?727 bc, king of Assyria (745--727), who greatly extended his empire, subjugating Syria and Palestine
References in periodicals archive ?
(13) "We do not know when the newly arrived people became truly assimilated with the remnants of the indigenous population of Samaria (it's hardly likely that the entire population of the Northern Kingdom went into the exile)." Tadmor, The Inscriptions of Tiglath-Pileser III King of Assyria, 287.
K.6205+82-3-23,131 (consisting of two joined fragments previously assigned separately to the reigns of Tiglath-pileser III and Sargon), which was published in its reunited form by N.
It is mentioned in the inscriptions of the Assyrian kings Tiglath-pileser III (Tadmor 1994: 172-73) and Sargon II, each of whom had one built for his pleasure.
Tiglath-pileser III is reckoned to have deported 95,000 people from Iran and Syria (744-742 BCE); Sargon II deported over 27,000 Israelites from Samaria (721) and expelled 108,000 people from the Babylonian region (707); while Sennacherib deported a further 208,000 from Babylon in 703 BCE.
state correspondence from the reigns of Tiglath-pileser III and Sargon II, possibly including a few letters from the short reign of Shalmaneser V as well.
The village was abandoned in the late eighth century, probably during the campaign of Tiglath-pileser III (Gal and Alexandre 2000: 178, 201).
Firstly, the monument of Tiglath-Pileser III is the only one known to have been established on the border of Egypt, and the unique placement described in the verse most likely derives from this unique event.
The Royal Inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III (744-727 BC) and Shalmaneser V (726-722 BC), Kings of Assyria.
From the invasion of Shoshenq (925 B.C.E.) until the Assyrian campaign of Tiglath-pileser III (734), Israel organized and developed exceptional chariotry and cavalry that engaged in nearly 200 years of effective border defense.
Its northern portion was annexed in 732 by Tiglath-pileser III and transformed into the province of Magidu (Megiddo).
The third and fourth chapters treat the political history of Byblos from the time of Tiglath-pileser III to the advent of Alexander the Great, while the fifth and sixth chapters address, respectively, the city's slow decline and its strategic evolution from the second haft of the 400S B.C.E.