Tilton, Theodore

Tilton, Theodore

Tilton, Theodore, 1835–1907, American journalist, b. New York City. After working for the New York Observer he was (1863–71) editor in chief of the Independent, a Congregationalist weekly. He later managed (1872–74) his own weekly, the Golden Age. A popular lyceum speaker, Tilton supported various social reforms such as woman suffrage. He and his wife were active parishioners of Henry Ward Beecher, whom, in what has been called 19th-cent. America's most famous scandal, Tilton sued (1874) for alleged adultery with Mrs. Tilton. The suit lasted for months and ended in a hung jury. In 1883, Tilton went to Europe, where he lived for the remainder of his life. His publications include a romantic novel, Tempest Tossed (1873), and several volumes of poetry.

Bibliography

See R. Shaplen, Free Love and Heavenly Sinners (1954); R. W. Fox, Trials of Intimacy (2000).

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References in periodicals archive ?
The Revolution had published poetry and fiction under Anthony and Stanton: Elizabeth Tilton, Theodore Tilton's spouse, was poetry editor, and Alice Cary had begun serializing The Born Thrall in the paper.