Tim Buck


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Buck, Tim

 

Born Jan. 6,1891. Figure in the communist and workers’ movement of Canada.

Born in Great Britain, Buck immigrated to Canada in 1910. From 1910 to 1920 he was a metal craftsman, a worker in railroad shops, and a foreman in various cities of the USA and Canada. From 1921 to 1929 he was secretary of the Workers’ Unity League of Canada. In June 1921 he was one of the organizers of the Communist Party of Canada (CPC). From June 1929 to January 1962 he was general secretary of the Party. He was repeatedly subjected to arrest and imprisonment. From 1935 to 1943 he was a member of the Executive Committee of the Comintern. Since January 1962 he has been president of the CPC.

WORKS

In Russian translation:
Tridtsat’ let kommunisticheskogo dvizheniia v Kanade (1922–52). Moscow, 1954.
Oktiabr’skaia revoliutsiia i kanadskoe rabochee dvizhenie. Moscow, 1957.
Nqsha bor’ba za Kanadu. Moscow, 1961.
Vliianie Velikoi Oktiabr’skoi revoliutsii na kanadskoe rabochee dvizhenie. Moscow, 1967.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) Outraged, the CPC later charged that "the government stands responsible for the attempted murder of Tim Buck." (3) Notably, Buck had found himself in prison for being "an officer" of an "unlawful organization" (the CPC).
For example: Tim Buck, William Kashtan, Nancy MacDonald, Samuel Walsh, Jean Pare, Stanley Ryerson (yes, that family), and Elizabeth Rowley (present-day Ontario Party Leader).
Tim Buck East Wind 01/09/12 Not Sched 6,023 Steel Nil
So commented Winnipeg's Jewish English-language weekly newspaper, The Jewish Post, about Tim Buck, General Secretary of the Communist Party of Canada (CPC) as he ran for a seat in Parliament in the constituency of Winnipeg North--a bastion of left-wing political support--during the federal election campaign of 1935.
And it was only the quick-thinking of the Sussex club's doctor Tim Buck which saved the limb from being amputated as he twisted the player's dislocated ankle back in place to allow the blood to circulate to the foot.
Tim Buck, leader of the Canadian Communist Party, went to Moscow in 1930 to outline plans for undermining the Canadian system.
During a riot, the prison guards fired into the cell of Communist Party leader Tim Buck. The story was custom-made for political drama, and Oscar Ryan, Frank Love, Ed Cecil-Smith and Mildred Goldberg rose to the task.
instance, both Graham Spry, leader of the Ontario CCF, and Tim Buck,
And it was only the quick- thinking of the Sussex club's doctor Tim Buck which saved the limb from being amputated as he twisted the player's dislocated ankle back in place to allow the blood to circulate to the foot.
It deals with the attempt by the Canadian state to assassinate the leader of the Communist Party of Canada, Tim Buck, in his Kingston prison cell.
Belford, in the running for United's Player of the Year, could have needed an amputation but for the actions of Dr Tim Buck.