Timaeus


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Timaeus

(tĭmē`əs), in the Bible, father of BartimaeusBartimaeus
, in the New Testament, blind man to whom Jesus restored sight.
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Timaeus

(tīmē`əs), c.356–c.260 B.C., Greek historian of Tauromenium (now Taormina), Sicily. Son of the tyrant of the city, he was banished by Agathocles either in 317 or 312 B.C. and lived for 50 years in Athens, where he wrote a history of his native land. This history, now lost except for fragments which have survived as quotations in other works, covered the period from earliest times to the events of his own lifetime. The work, though severely criticized by Polybius, was important in that it standardized the various accounts of Sicilian history.

Bibliography

See study by T. S. Brown (1958).

Timaeus

 

Born circa 356 B.C.; died circa 260 B.C. Greek historian.

Timaeus wrote several works, the most important of which, the Histories, consisted of either 38 or 43 books. The work recorded the history of Sicily, Timaeus’ birthplace, from the earliest period to the death of Pyrrhus in 273 B.C. and included information on Italy and northern Africa (Carthage). Timaeus was the first, beginning in 264 B.C, to reckon time according to Olympiads. Minor fragments of his writings are preserved in the works of subsequent classical authors.

REFERENCE

Müller. C. Fragmenta historicorum graecorum, vol. 1. Paris, 1841.
References in classic literature ?
in the Phaedrus, Phaedo, Republic; to which may be added the criticism of them in the Parmenides, the personal form which is attributed to them in the Timaeus, the logical character which they assume in the Sophist and Philebus, and the allusion to them in the Laws.
No doubt is expressed by Plato, either in the Timaeus or in any other dialogue, of the truths which he conceives to be the first and highest.
Here we catch a reminiscence both of the omoiomere, or similar particles of Anaxagoras, and of the world-animal of the Timaeus.
For so much was then subject to demonstration, that the globe of the earth had great parts beyond the Atlantic, which mought be probably conceived not to be all sea: and adding thereto the tradition in Plato's Timaeus, and his Atlanticus, it mought encourage one to turn it to a prediction.
We may judge from the noble commencement of the Timaeus, from the fragment of the Critias itself, and from the third book of the Laws, in what manner Plato would have treated this high argument.
When Socrates, in Charmides, tells us that the soul is cured of its maladies by certain incantations, and that these incantations are beautiful reasons, from which temperance is generated in souls; when Plato calls the world an animal; and Timaeus affirms that the plants also are animals; or affirms a man to be a heavenly tree, growing with his root, which is his head, upward; and, as George Chapman, following him, writes,--
The difference between deconstruction's word-orientated acosmism and the newer versions of thing-oriented cosmism can be fruitfully explored by comparing Derrida to Serres on the basis of their readings of Plato's cosmogony, focused on the figure of chora in Timaeus.
In this paper, the authors highlight a number of difficulties concerning the relationship between the Critias and the Timaeus, notably a contradiction between Timaeus 27a-b and Critias 108a-c.
For instance, he delves into the Timaeus, Plato's creation myth, where we learn about how an immaterial god created the universe by using numerically modeled perfect Forms to shape an imperfect material world and all its objects.
As Jesus was leaving Jericho with his disciples and a sizable crowd, Bartimaeus, a blind man, the son of Timaeus, sat by the roadside begging.
While she will have certain things to say about these dialogues, especially Phaedrus and Alcibiades I, she will focus on the role of eros in Timaeus, Cratylus, Protagoras, Parmenides, Theaetetus, and Phaedo.
He writes that it has been pointed out how "Galileo's observations on the reflected light of planets, as well as Plato's discussion of the phenomenon in the Timaeus, were available to Donne and provide a much more likely source for the image than the fixed stars" (8).