Timaeus


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Timaeus

(tĭmē`əs), in the Bible, father of BartimaeusBartimaeus
, in the New Testament, blind man to whom Jesus restored sight.
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Timaeus

(tīmē`əs), c.356–c.260 B.C., Greek historian of Tauromenium (now Taormina), Sicily. Son of the tyrant of the city, he was banished by Agathocles either in 317 or 312 B.C. and lived for 50 years in Athens, where he wrote a history of his native land. This history, now lost except for fragments which have survived as quotations in other works, covered the period from earliest times to the events of his own lifetime. The work, though severely criticized by Polybius, was important in that it standardized the various accounts of Sicilian history.

Bibliography

See study by T. S. Brown (1958).

Timaeus

 

Born circa 356 B.C.; died circa 260 B.C. Greek historian.

Timaeus wrote several works, the most important of which, the Histories, consisted of either 38 or 43 books. The work recorded the history of Sicily, Timaeus’ birthplace, from the earliest period to the death of Pyrrhus in 273 B.C. and included information on Italy and northern Africa (Carthage). Timaeus was the first, beginning in 264 B.C, to reckon time according to Olympiads. Minor fragments of his writings are preserved in the works of subsequent classical authors.

REFERENCE

Müller. C. Fragmenta historicorum graecorum, vol. 1. Paris, 1841.
References in classic literature ?
in the Phaedrus, Phaedo, Republic; to which may be added the criticism of them in the Parmenides, the personal form which is attributed to them in the Timaeus, the logical character which they assume in the Sophist and Philebus, and the allusion to them in the Laws.
In the Timaeus, which in the series of Plato's works immediately follows the Republic, though probably written some time afterwards, no mention occurs of the doctrine of ideas.
In the exaltation of the reason or intellect, in the denial of the voluntariness of evil (Timaeus; Laws) Spinoza approaches nearer to Plato than in his conception of an infinite substance.
Here we catch a reminiscence both of the omoiomere, or similar particles of Anaxagoras, and of the world-animal of the Timaeus.
For so much was then subject to demonstration, that the globe of the earth had great parts beyond the Atlantic, which mought be probably conceived not to be all sea: and adding thereto the tradition in Plato's Timaeus, and his Atlanticus, it mought encourage one to turn it to a prediction.
We may judge from the noble commencement of the Timaeus, from the fragment of the Critias itself, and from the third book of the Laws, in what manner Plato would have treated this high argument.
When Socrates, in Charmides, tells us that the soul is cured of its maladies by certain incantations, and that these incantations are beautiful reasons, from which temperance is generated in souls; when Plato calls the world an animal; and Timaeus affirms that the plants also are animals; or affirms a man to be a heavenly tree, growing with his root, which is his head, upward; and, as George Chapman, following him, writes,--
The mental faculties of sensus, imaginatio, ratio, and intellegentia are arranged as a proportion suggesting both Plato's famous "divided line" at the end of Book 6 of the Republic and, at the same time, the four elements of the physical cosmos which, according to the Platonic Timaeus, are connected with one another so as to form a geometrical proportion.
Plato's Timaeus is a metaphorical text on time and eternity, being and nothingness, and the finite and infinite, says Margel, but it is also a moral text thematizing the relations between the soul and the body.
Chapter 3 continues this historical-geometrical-philosophical account in the same way, from Thales, through Pythagoras, and all the way to the so-called cosmic figures of Plato's Timaeus. Recall that Hahn's case entails supplying historical evidence whether geometrical diagrams, as attempts to solve practical problems, might have influenced the philosophical musings of Pythagoras and his school.
As Jesus was leaving Jericho with his disciples and a sizable crowd, Bartimaeus, a blind man, the son of Timaeus, sat by the roadside begging.
To answer these questions, Pitteloud undertakes a survey of the whole platonic corpus: starting with the Hippias Major he examines several major dialogues, including Phaedo, Phaedrus, Republic, Parmenides, Sophist, finally concluding with the Timaeus. The outcome of this meticulous and comprehensive survey is that: (1) Forms are separate from sensible things, and (2) separation means that Forms are related to sensible things in the way that a model is related to its image, namely (2i) sensible things are ontologically dependent on Forms but (2ii) to look at the model and to look at the image is to look at the same thing from two different viewpoints.