Timanthes


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Timanthes

(tĭmăn`thēz), fl. c.400 B.C., Greek painter of Sicyon, a contemporary of Parrhasius and Zeuxis. His masterpiece, Sacrifice of Iphigenia, was considered one of the great ancient paintings. His work is known through the writings of Pliny, who speaks of his skill in depicting emotions.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the case of Cyllopsis philodice, Eretris hulda, and Pronophila timanthes (Satyrinae).
In addition, a triumphal arch with three bodies was built across from the palace, decorated with images of painters from ancient times, such as Apelles and Timanthes, and of Roman emperors.
Odo Marquart and Karlheinz Stierle (Munchen: Fink, 1979), 83-106; Rolf Konersmann, "Welttheater als Daseinsmetapher" in Der Schleier des Timanthes: Perspektiven der historischen Semantik (Frankfurt a.M.: Fischer, 1994), 84-168, and Siegmund Schlossmann, Persona und prosopon im Recht und im christlichen Dogma (Kid/Leipzig: Lipsius & Tischler, 1906; repr., Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1968).
Among the paintings was a depiction of a hero by Timanthes (35.74), of Ialysus (local hero of Rhodes) by Protogenes (35.101-02) and of Scylla by Nicomachus (35.108-09).
Elsheimer's peculiar contribution to this was a tremulous expression of the love that united the Holy Family, and a dedication to church history Just as Timanthes famously won a competition in antiquity by making people imagine Agamemnon's gnu at having to sacrifice his daughter Iphigenia by concealing his face in his cloak, so with Elsheimer it is what we don't see which is often so moving.
The connection between the serpent's head in Barry's Self-portrait in the role of Timanthes (National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin) and the 'cancer' of anti-Catholicism within the British ecclesiastical establishment, for which Cullen argues, is extremely tenuous.