Timber Dam

Timber Dam

 

a dam whose main load-carrying structural elements are made of wood, primarily coniferous varieties such as pine and fir. Timber dams are made for small heads (2-4 m or, rarely, 4-8 m) and usually have sluices; according to the design of the apron they are divided into pile, crib, pile-crib, and buttressed dams. The openings of timber dams are restricted by abutments; where the sluice is very long it is divided into several openings by intermediate supports: piers, buttresses, and posts. The openings are covered by wooden shields, usually several in a row one above the other. Simple hoists—permanent or mobile winches—are used to raise and lower the shields.

References in periodicals archive ?
Shortly after the Power Corporation bought it, the old rock and timber dam threatened to break, endangering cabins and homes downstream from Prosperous Lake.
The project, run with help from the National Trust, has led to the building of 1,021 stone dams, 10 timber dams, and 229 plastic dams to prevent peat being washed away on Wessenden Moor.