Timer

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timer

a switch or regulator that causes a mechanism to operate at a specific time or at predetermined intervals

Timer

 

a control device that, after a predetermined time interval, automatically starts or stops a system, machine, or apparatus used in industry or the home. The term “timer” is also applied to a monitoring device that signals when such a system, machine, or apparatus is to be started or stopped. Depending on the principle of operation, a timer can be mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, or electrical. The time interval of a timer is usually predetermined in the same way as in a timing relay.

Timers are classified as single-shot, multishot, and repeat-cycle. In single-shot timers the time interval is usually set manually, for example, by moving the hand of the time indicator. In this case, the timer mechanism is simultaneously wound, and the timer will operate when the hand returns to zero. Multishot timers automatically operate several times with preset time intervals. Repeat-cycle timers operate with the same time interval (the period of the cycle) after equal periods of time. In multishot and repeat-cycle timers the sequence of time intervals, or the timer schedule, is prescribed by such means as a punched tape, a disk with pins, or a system of shaped cams.

Timers based on clocks have the highest accuracy and reliability, as well as the broadest range of time intervals. Clockworks are used mostly in single-shot and multishot timers designed for operation within a 24-hour period. Electric and electronic time measurement devices are used mostly in repeat-cycle timers that function continuously over periods of several months.

B. M. CHERNIAGIN


Timer

 

a circuit used in, for example, radar sets, television equipment, and telecommunication systems primarily for the purpose of ensuring that certain processes occur in conformity to certain time relationships.

In radar sets, for example, timers provide synchronization of such processes as the emission of radio signals by the transmitter, the blocking of the receiver during transmission, and the starting of indicator sweeps at the instant the signal is received. In telemetry systems, multichannel pulse communication systems, and other information systems, timers provide a fixed spacing between, for example, information-carrying symbols (in digital transmission) or word or address markers.

The main component of a timer is a generator of frequency-stable oscillations, such as a quartz-crystal oscillator or a maser. The oscillations are used for such purposes as synchronization or the provision of local time markers either directly—that is, in the form they are taken from the oscillator output—or after conversion to other oscillations (or pulses) that are characterized by certain altered parameters, such as frequency, phase, or amplitude. In the case of pulses, the characterizing parameters include pulse duration and shape.

A. F. BOGOMOLOV

timer

[′tīm·ər]
(computer science)
A hardware device that can interrupt a computer program after a time interval specified by the program, generally to remind the program to take some action.
(electronics)
A circuit used in radar and in electronic navigation systems to start pulse transmission and synchronize it with other actions, such as the start of a cathode-ray sweep.
(engineering)
A device for automatically starting or stopping a machine or other device.
(mechanical engineering)
A device that controls timing of the ignition spark of an internal combustion engine at the correct time.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: PACT Club Timer III feels the best in our hands and presents a large, unmistakable "GO" button.
Traffic signal countdown timers work well at fixed-time signals, Hurwitz said, but they may not be practical for actuated signals; at those intersections, he said, a light typically changes only one to four seconds after the decision to change it is made - not enough time for a countdown timer to be of value.
Available for most mobile devices, users can control the same functions as a wired SPT solution, and view countdowns and other timer functions on a corresponding tablet -- a unique attribute and an industry first for production timers.
The General Tools and Instruments TI239 is the smallest of the timers, although it hosts a good-sized display with four digits for minutes and seconds.
He admitted that canceling the timers contributed to the rise in traffic violations by motorists, mostly because the motorists are confused about the time left to takeoff or stop, thus they fall victims to traffic cameras.
8220;The team at Time Timer is absolutely thrilled to be the recipient of the Learning magazine Teachers' Choice Award for the Classroom for our Time Timer PLUS,” said Dave Rogers, president of Time Timer, LLC.
The timers initially display the usual green man symbol indicating it is safe to start crossing the road, followed by a countdown timer that counts down the seconds before it turns red.
The Pocket Pro II is made by Competition Electronics, one of the pioneers in the field of shot timers.
THIS neat little timer is by far the easiest to programme and read, and with 98 on/off programmes, plus random and countdown functions it gives you more than enough options.
said it planned to offer rebates for customers who replace their existing timers with smart controllers and participate in a water-efficiency survey, but the plan is still being worked out, said Bob DiPrimio, the utility's general manager.
In reality, the boiler is running inefficiently because of the timer, wasting energy and costing more money," says Edward Winiarski, president of OAS, Inc.