Timocracy


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Timocracy

 

as defined by classical authors, a form of government in which power rests in the hands of a privileged few who possess great property qualifications. Timocracy, therefore, is a variant of oligarchy. The term “timocracy” appears in Plato’s Republic (VIII, 545) and Aristotle’s Ethics (VIII and XII). Xenophon identifies timocracy with plutocracy. Examples of timocratic governments were the state systems established in Athens in the sixth century B.C., after the reforms of Solon, and in Rome after the reforms attributed to Servius Tullius.

References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, there is another type of management theory that is called timocracy. However, this theory is a kind of management that has been viewed as an idealistic management system to provide all citizens, residents, and tourists with "honorable, ethical, moral, and legal" rights for the sake of humanness.
Aristotle was frequently cited for his views that political authority should be expressed in law rather than kept implicit in the will of a single person or group of persons; that when the rule of law corresponds to truths of natural justice, then, in an important sense divine rather than human reason orders the affairs of the body politic; that there is a natural aristocracy, related to real differences in virtue among persons, and skilled statecraft arranges things so that this element acquires authority, or, failing that, blends democratic and oligarchic influences in society to approximate to that outcome; and that the best form of government in nearly all circumstances involves the balancing of aspects of all three pure regimes (kingship, aristocracy, and timocracy).
Depending of the characters in the citadel Platon highlights the following forms of governing: timocracy or timarchy, constitution amateur of honors, then, oligarchy or the oligarchic, in the third place, democracy as well as the democratic individual, and in the fourth place, tyranny or the tyrannical soul.
At Brighton, switchback track specialist TIMOCRACY can defy top weight in the 21st June Take That Summer Music Night Handicap (7.05).
MUSSELBURGH: 2.15 Red Roar, 2.50 Timocracy, 3.25 Revue Princess, 4.00 Hamloola, 4.35 Red Jade, 5.10 Lady Bluesky, 5.40 Highland Warrior.
THE MAIL'S RACING CORRESPONDENT Paul's Top Tips HAYDOCK 1.30 Moonsail 2.05 Kronful 2.35 Sunny Game 3.10 Horseradish 3.45 Foxy Music 4.20 Genius Beast 4.55 Dabbers Ridge 5.30 Frontline Girl TOMORROW ASCOT 2.25 Ibsaar 3.00 Magicalmysterytour 3.35 Free Agent (nap) 4.10 Laaheb 4.45 Sayif 5.20 Brick Red MUSSELBURGH 2.15 Red Roar 2.50 Timocracy 3.25 Revue Princess 4.00 Hamloola 4.35 Red Jade 5.10 Lady Bluesky 5.40 Highland Warrior MARKET RASEN 2.00 Rudanphast 2.35 Play A Cord 3.10 Bobbie Magern 3.45 King's Forest 4.20 Billie Magern 4.55 Red Birr 5.30 River Dragon FULFORD'S FLYERS HAYDOCK: 2.35 Herculean ASCOT (Sun): 3.35 Free Agent MUSSELBURGH (Sun): 4.00 Path of Peace MARKET RASEN (Sun): 3.10 Bobbie Magern
Andy Haynes is aiming for 10 successive wins with Timocracy and he can edge a step closer with victory number seven at Redcar.
This stage of government, the timocracy, is the beginning of the decay of the good society and the first step on the slide toward tyranny.
One such example is found in [section]2.1.8, where Bar-Hebraeus mentions six types of government: 1) "sole government" (dubbara lhudaya), i.e., monarchy (which Bar-Hebraeus says is also called "tyranny"), 2) "government of graciousness" (dubbar taybuta), i.e., timocracy, 3) "government of vileness and minority" (dubbar saytuta wa-zor yuta), i.e., oligarchy, 4) "government of unanimity" (dubbar salmuta), i.e., democracy, 5) "government of pre-eminence" (dubbar tarquta), i.e., aristocracy, and finally 6) "royal government" (dubbara malkaya).
I believe that we can see a similar gesture at the beginning of book 8, where in direct contradiction to Socrates' claims in book 3, Homer's invocation of the Muse is allowed to reappear only with the dissolution of the best city and the degeneration into timocracy. Indeed, it is the Muses now who tell us how "faction first attacked" ([GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).
Socrates explains the emergence of timocracy as the outcome of a quarrel between aristocrats and oligarchs, or lovers of virtue and lovers of money; these are precisely the terms in which Xenophon presents his conflict with Silanus, Timasion, and Thorax (cf.
There is ample warrant for this in one sense since he is clearly a critic of popular rule, though he is also a harsh critic of oligarchy, tyranny, and the Spartan-style regime he calls timocracy. To understand the true ground of Plato's political criticism, then, one cannot simply look to what he opposes, but must look to what he affirms, which is not the politics of any of the conventional regimes, but rather of philosophy and the mixed regime advocated in the Laws and Seventh Letter.