Timon of Phlius


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Timon of Phlius

(flī`əs), c.320–c.230 B.C., Greek skeptic philosopher, chief disciple of PyrrhoPyrrho
, c.360–270 B.C., Greek philosopher, a native of Elis, regarded as the father of skepticism. After accompanying Alexander the Great to Asia, he enjoyed great respect at Elis and Athens. His doctrines were preserved by his disciple, Timon of Phlius, in satires.
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. Timon denied the possibility of certain knowledge and, like his master, taught that the philosopher can achieve peace of mind only by suspension of judgment and indifference to externals. After Timon's death the skeptics lost their separate identity and became absorbed into the Academy. Only fragments of his work have survived.
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underwent significant changes through the works of Timon of Phlius, Aenesidemus of Cnossos, Agrippa, and then Sextus himself and beyond.
Of the four papers on skepticism two address literary questions concerning Timon of Phlius, Pyrrho's main disciple, whom Brunschwig reveals as a considerably more original thinker than most scholars have admitted.