ringworm

(redirected from Tinea infections)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

ringworm

or

tinea

(tĭn`ēə), superficial eruption of the skin caused by a fungus, chiefly Microsporum, Trichophyton, or Epidermophyton. Any area of the skin may be affected, including the scalp and nails, but the most common site is the feet. That disorder is often called athlete's foot in the belief that the infection is contracted during the use of communal shower facilities. Actually, fungi are present on the bodies of most persons, but some individuals are more resistant to fungus invasion than others. Moreover, a prolonged moist, airless condition caused by excessive perspiration may subject a formerly resistant person to fungus invasion. Ringworm infection causes dry, scaly patches or blisterlike elevations, usually with burning or itching. Griseofulvin, a modified form of penicillin, is effective against scalp infection but is ineffective against foot fungi. In mild cases of athlete's foot, often the only treatment is to keep the feet scrupulously dry. In more persistent cases local antifungal ointments, sprays, or soaks are recommended.

ringworm

[′riŋ‚wərm]
(medicine)
A fungus infection of skin, hair, or nails producing annular lesions with elevated margins. Also known as tinea.

ringworm

any of various fungal infections of the skin (esp the scalp) or nails, often appearing as itching circular patches
References in periodicals archive ?
more than 22 million prescriptions are written annually for tinea infections. Currently approved products for the topical treatment of tinea pedis are only modestly effective, have a high reoccurrence rate and require a month of therapy.
* Short-duration topical therapy with terbinafine, naftifine, and butenafine is efficacious for most epidermal tinea infections (A).
* Short courses of oral itraconazole and terbinafine are safe and effective in treating tinea infections (A).
Based on systematic reviews of randomized, controlled studies, it is possible to recommend specific first-line therapies for tinea infections.
Tinea infections of the face and body begin as flat, scaly, and often pruritic macules that subsequently develop a raised border and begin to spread radially.
Some patients with clinically significant tinea infections may be using over-the-counter topical antifungal medications, thus reducing the likelihood that fungal hyphae will be visualized at the office visit.
Treatment of tinea infections may rely on antifungal medications singly or in combination.
Most tinea infections may be treated with topical agents alone.
Caution in making contact with animals or people that have known tinea infections may reduce the incidence of tinea corporis.
Despite abundant literature documenting the apparent safety of the newer agents, only the makers of griseofulvin have obtained FDA approval for treating pediatric tinea infections. (Fluconazole is approved for the treatment of thrush.) More than 90% of the cases of tinea capitis in the United States are caused by Trichophyton tonsurans; thus, concern about resistant Microsporum canis is probably overemphasized.
32 out of 100 patients gave history of contact with Tinea infection among family members which included 9 families where Tinea capitis was present in more than one child in the family.
32 patients had contact with Tinea infection within the family and two in the school.