Tiphiidae

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Tiphiidae

[tə′fī·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
A family of the Hymenoptera in the superfamily Scolioidea.

Tiphiidae

 

a family of stinging insects of the order Hymenoptera. The offspring are fed the larvae of lamellicorn beetles. Tiphia femorata is common in the south of the European part of the USSR. It has a black, shiny body measuring 9–12 mm in length; it parasitizes the larvae of Amphimallon solstitialis. Two tiphiid species, Tiphia vernalis and Tiphia popillivora, were imported into the USA between 1920 and 1936 from Japan and China; they are the principal natural enemies of the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica).

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The scientists combined data from the transcriptome -- showing which genes are active and being transcribed from DNA into RNA -- and genomic (DNA) data from a number of species of ants, bees and wasps, including bradynobaenid wasps, a cuckoo wasp, a spider wasp, a scoliid wasp, a mud dauber wasp, a tiphiid wasp, a paper wasp and a pollen wasp; a velvet ant (wasp); a dracula ant; and a sweat bee, Lasioglossum albipes.
A pair of unrelated insects that feed on nectar as adults, tachinid flies and the one-and-a-quarter-inch five-banded tiphiid wasp, evolved to locate native may beetle (june Bug) larvae underground and dig down to lay their parasitic eggs on or near them.
Phylogenetic relationships among the south american thynnine tiphiid wasps (Hymenoptera).
The most-collected predators were the deer fly Tabanus subsimilis Bellardi, caught in the Malaise trap, and the tiphiid wasp Myzinum frontalis (Cresson), presumed parasites of scarab larvae (Kimsey 2009) that occurred in large swarms of males around P.
vernalis in Connecticut had not been monitored since the 1950 USDA survey and tiphiid wasp parasitoids of white grubs had been considered rare in Connecticut (Abbey 2001).
Curculionids, ants, and tiphiids have been recorded as floral visitors and important pollinators of diverse plant species (Brown 1998; Ratnayake et al.