Tiragan

Tiragan

July, November, December; 13th day of Tir, the fourth Zoroastrian month
Tiragan is a Zoroastrian celebration in honor of Tishtrya, a deity identified with rain as well as Sirius, the Dog Star. It is held during the gahambar or seasonal feast of Maidyoshahem, also known as the Mid-Summer Feast. The followers of Persian prophet Zoroaster (also known as Zarathushtra, believed to have lived around 1200 b.c.e.), believe that dogs belong to the good part of creation and that they serve as helpers to mankind. Dogs are also thought to possess the ability to see spiritual beings. Much like the celebration of Holi in India and of Songkran in Thailand, the festival's activities include splashing people with water.
The 13th day of Tir is also associated with a legendary event during the reign of King Minochiher, when a dispute about the boundary between Iran and Turan (a region in what is now southeastern Iran) was decided by the throwing of an arrow (tir) by an archer named Erekhsha.
There are only about 100,000 followers of Zoroastrianism today, and most of them live in northwestern India or Iran. Smaller communities exist in Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Canada, the U.S., England, and Australia.
SOURCES:
RelHolCal-2004, p. 67