Tisza


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Tisza

(tĭs`ə), Serbian Tisa (tē`sä), Rus. Tissa or Tisa (both: tĭs`ə), Ger. Theiss (tīs), river, c.600 mi (970 km) long, formed by two headstreams in the Carpathians, W Ukraine. It flows generally S across E Hungary, past Szolnok and Szeged, into N Serbia, where it enters the Danube River E of Novi Sad. The Körös and Mureşul rivers are its chief tributaries. There are hydroelectric facilities on the river in Hungary. The Tisza is navigable for small craft to Szolnok and is also used to float timber.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tisza

 

(also Tisa), a river in the USSR, Hungary, and Yugoslavia and partly along the border between the USSR and Rumania as well as between Hungary and Czechoslovakia; the largest left tributary of the Danube. The Tisza is 966 km long and drains an area of 157,100 sq km, of which 46 percent is in Rumania and 30 percent in Hungary. Rising in the Eastern Carpathians, the river flows for most of its course along the Middle Danube Plain. Its chief tributaries, joining it on the left, are the Szamos, Körös, and Mureş.

The Tisza is fed by snow and rain; the high-water period is in March and April, with occasional summer rain freshets; the winter discharge is insignificant. The freeze-up period varies in duration, lasting from one to months in cold winters. The mean flow rate along the river’s lower course, near Senta in Yugoslavia, is 810 cu m per sec. Severe flooding sometimes occurs in the Tisza River basin; the latest was in 1970. Water from the Tisza and from its tributaries is widely used for irrigation. In Hungary, the hydroengineering complexes of Tiszalok and Kiskóre (with a reservoir approximately 30 km long) were built on the Tisza. Numerous irrigation canals extend from the river into the Alfóld, or Great Hungarian Lowland. The river is navigable as far as Tisza-karád, in Hungary; in its upper reaches, it is used for floating timber. Cities located on the Tisza include Khust in the USSR and Tiszafüred, Szolnok, and Szeged in Hungary.

A. P. MURANOV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Tisza

a river in S central Europe, rising in W Ukraine and flowing west, forming part of the border between Ukraine and Romania, then southwest across Hungary into Serbia to join the Danube north of Belgrade
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The event will take place in parallel with ENREG ENERGIA REGENERABILA[R], the biggest trade fair on renewable energy and energy efficiency in construction and renovation in the euro-region Danube - Cris - Mures - Tisza.
On the contrary, the Lake Tisza Region, despite being also competitive, due to the disadvantageous productivity processes, can be characterized as of multi-factorial competitive advantage.
The Tisza affair was a trial for "ritual murder" against fifteen people from a small Jewish community in a village in Northern Hungary (1882-83), accused of killing a young Gentile woman, Esther Solymosi, and collecting her blood at the synagogue in order to prepare their unleavened Easter bread (matzos).
After a brief research history on the Koros culture by Whittle where the wider project framework and specific aims are described in greater detail, there follows a series of contributions on the environmental setting of the site, the fluvial plains of the river Berettyo, a tributary to the river Tisza. Katherine Willis follows with an interesting study on the environmental impact of the early farmers: she concludes that the settlement had only minor effects on the landscape, notably clearances were minimal as opposed to those of later Neolithic cultures.
The negotiations concerned the division's Hungarian unit Ruukki Tisza Zrt and senior salaried employees in the division's Tampere, Hameenlinna and Helsinki units in Finland.
Experts say the Vatican Climate Forest, which has more than 1000 trees near Hungary's Tisza River, will absorb as much carbon dioxide as the Vatican emits through cars, heating and lighting.
In January 2000, cyanide from a Romanian gold mine spilled into the Tisza River, killing nearly all the aquatic life and fouling the drinking water of millions of people.
This strategy or action plan, agreed in the form of a declaration from the "Reducing Environment and Security Risks from Mining in South Eastern Europe and the Tisza River Basin", aims to tackle a wide range of issues confronting governments, local authorities and industry.
Habitat preference.--We collected the specimens in the calciferous open sand steppes (Festucetum vaginatae danubiale) in the area between the rivers Danube and Tisza and on the Small Hungarian Plain, and in the acidic open sand steppes of the Nyirseg area (Festuco vaginatae-Corynephoretum).
Also, the Tisza Agreement for coordinating water quality and flood risk management was signed by Hungary, Romania, Serbia-Montenegro, Slovakia and Ukraine.
These include the devastating oil spills from the Erica and Prestige tankers, off the coasts of France and Spain; the cyanide pollution in the Tisza river in Hungary and Romania in 2000 and the widespread pollution from the Donana metal mine in south-west Spain in 1998.