Tithonus


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Tithonus

(tĭthō`nəs), in Greek mythology, prince of Troy; son of Laomedon. He was loved by the dawn goddess, Eos, who bore him Memnon. When Eos begged Zeus to bestow immortality upon Tithonus, she forgot to ask the god to grant her lover eternal youth; so Tithonus grew older and older until Eos, out of pity, changed him into a grasshopper.

Tithonus

granted immortality but not eternal youth; continually got older. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz]

Tithonus

given eternal life but not eternal youth. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 1087]

Tithonus

unable to remove him from the earth because of his immortality, Eos changes him into a grasshopper. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 901]
References in periodicals archive ?
Tithonus has the plum rail draw and, after winning both the Rockingham Handicap (over five furlongs) and the Scurry Handicap (over six furlongs), Denis Hogan's charge will have plenty of supporters and his style of racing from the front will make him difficult to peg back.
Like any father with a beloved daughter (goddess or not), Zeus bowed to her beauty and did as he was told, granting Tithonus immortality.
Tithonus can effect little change, even in his state of mind; and yet pressed down, as he is, by the weight of circumstance and fate, the smallest space in which to move, even if not to escape, is a significant opportunity for relief.
Tennyson's Tithonus may have "pass[ed] beyond the goal of ordinance" (30), but he will forever approach the final mortal bound only asymptotically, just as for Ulysses, the "margin fades / For ever and for ever when I move" (20-21).
Here, the messenger, who is about to repeat word for word the prophetic monologue Cassandra delivered and that he heard, describes Dawn rising and leaving behind her lover, Tithonus, who is said to be the addressee's brother from a different mother.
What looks like purely fanciful speculation draws on the universal dream of extending life and avoiding death, joining mythical figures like Tithonus or channeling Karel Capek and Leo Janaicek's The Makropulous Case in fantasies on an all too human concern.
This kind of immortality is like the persistence of Tithonus, the Trojan prince who could neither die nor stave off the debilitating effects of age.
According to Greek mythology, the hapless mortal Tithonus mistakenly asked the goddess Eos to confer eternal life rather than eternal youth.
Classicists mostly from the US but also Europe and Australia discuss such aspects as the discovery and textual constitution of the Cologne Sappho, Tithonus in the New Sappho and the narrated mythical exemplum in archaic Greek poetry, aging in the New (and old) Sappho, the meter and metrical style, the New Sappho in a Hellenistic poetry book, philosophical reflections on death and aging, and the New Sappho reconsidered in light of the Athenian reception of Sappho.
But for all its detail and deep immersion in distant events, After Many A Summer is also a contemporary cri de coeur for a baseball era that will never return, and its aptly chosen title from Tennyson's Tithonus recalls lines that capture the abiding melancholy of our loss:
Lynch, "Tennyson's Tithonus, Huxley's After Many a Summer and Waugh's The Loved One.
Tithonus eventually becomes a creature so dry and rasping that he turns into a cicada.