Death in Venice

(redirected from Tod in Venedig)

Death in Venice

aging successful author loses his lifelong self-discipline in his love for a beautiful Polish boy. [Ger. Lit: Death in Venice]
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Dierks, as often before, asserts as a fact that when writing Der Tod in Venedig Mann not only read but studied Freud's essay Der Wahn unddie Traume in W.
The translated authorAEs works under consideration include, Johann Wolfgang von GoetheAEs Die Leiden des jungen Werther and Novelle, Thomas MannAEs Der Tod in Venedig, and Franz KafkaAEs Die Verwandlung.
Ritchie Robertson writes that in Der Tod in Venedig Mann comments on the unstable relation between art and desire through the protagonist.
Thomas Mann (1875-1955), escritor aleman nacionalizado esta-dunidense, escribio en 1912 la novela corta Der Tod in Venedig (Muerte en Venecia), una de sus mejores obras, llevada a la pantalla en 1971 por el cineasta italiano Luchino Visconti conde de Lonate Pozzolo (1906-1976) como Morte a Venizia, resulto mucho mas melodramatica que la novela, en virtud de algunos cambios introducidos por Visconti: el protagonista Gustav von Aschenbach interpretado por Dirk Bogarde no es escritor sino un compositor, inspirado en Gustav Mahler, cuya musica se escucha a lo largo del filme, en especial el hermoso Adagietto de la Quinta Sinfonia.
But he is also acutely aware that the theme of lateness saturates all of Mann's writing and so he frequently refers back to earlier works, especially Der Tod in Venedig.
Merete Mazzarella's literary references (and they are legion) are put to more orderly use, as she takes her reader -- who feels not a little uncomfortable -- on a course through other examples of aging, from such Swedish classics as Sven Lidman's Huset med de gamla froknarna and Hjalmar Bergman's Farmor och Var Herre, through Thomas Mann's Tod in Venedig and Lotte in Weimar, through Doris Lessing and John Updike and Alison Lurie, through Kerstin Ekman, Ingrid Sjostrand, and (horrifyingly) Ulla Isaksson, through -- in Finland -- Runeberg's pathetic mother and Rolf Lagerborg (a chilling quotation about the true nature of death), and then to the neglected Paul von Martens and the much less neglected Anja Snellman.
Death in Venice Novella by Mann, Thomas, published in German as Der Tod in Venedig in 1912.
Der Tod in Venedig, 1912; translated as 1925) A novella by Thomas Mann.
The themes of aging and masculinity have found only limited interest in analyses of "Der Tod in Venedig.
Contributions which are likely to be of greater interest to the specialist include Hans Rudolf Vaget's rereading of Doktor Faustus, Eva Wessell's discussion of Der Zauberberg's affinities with Mann's essayistic reflections on the First World War, and Hans-Joachim Sandberg's stimulating consideration of Mann's abandoned novel on Frederick the Great and its place in the genesis and architecture of Der Tod in Venedig.
After publication of the novellas Kroger, Tonio and Tristan (both 1903), he took up the tragic dilemma of the artist with Der Tod in Venedig (1912; Death in Venice), a somber masterpiece.
Such is the case when he categorizes Der Tod in Venedig as "a summation of Mann's early career, a final novella that rehearses one more time Mann's deepest preoccupations, while pointing the way toward a new interest in myth," and then little more than a page later characterizes an aspect of the same story as simultaneously elevating "his story of homosexual passion into a timeless classical myth" (47, 51).