Death in Venice

(redirected from Tod in Venedig)

Death in Venice

aging successful author loses his lifelong self-discipline in his love for a beautiful Polish boy. [Ger. Lit: Death in Venice]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The translated authorAEs works under consideration include, Johann Wolfgang von GoetheAEs Die Leiden des jungen Werther and Novelle, Thomas MannAEs Der Tod in Venedig, and Franz KafkaAEs Die Verwandlung.
In Thomas Mann's Der Tod in Venedig, Gustav von Aschenbach, nationally acclaimed and recently ennobled author, is swept away by a sudden pang of Wanderlust sparked by a homoerotically charged exchange of stares with an unknown man in a park.
But he is also acutely aware that the theme of lateness saturates all of Mann's writing and so he frequently refers back to earlier works, especially Der Tod in Venedig. At the centre, though, is Doktor Faustus, because Mann himself regarded the works that came afterward as the writings of a man who had outlived himself, late works.
Merete Mazzarella's literary references (and they are legion) are put to more orderly use, as she takes her reader -- who feels not a little uncomfortable -- on a course through other examples of aging, from such Swedish classics as Sven Lidman's Huset med de gamla froknarna and Hjalmar Bergman's Farmor och Var Herre, through Thomas Mann's Tod in Venedig and Lotte in Weimar, through Doris Lessing and John Updike and Alison Lurie, through Kerstin Ekman, Ingrid Sjostrand, and (horrifyingly) Ulla Isaksson, through -- in Finland -- Runeberg's pathetic mother and Rolf Lagerborg (a chilling quotation about the true nature of death), and then to the neglected Paul von Martens and the much less neglected Anja Snellman.
Death in Venice Novella by Mann, Thomas, published in German as Der Tod in Venedig in 1912.
(Der Tod in Venedig, 1912; translated as 1925) A novella by Thomas Mann.
Excellent examples of the former are Ehrhard Bahr's essay on art and society in Mann's early novellas and Clayton Koelb's discussion of Der Tod in Venedig, both of which present lucid expositions of the texts together with introductions to the interpretative issues which have traditionally surrounded them.
After publication of the novellas Kroger, Tonio and Tristan (both 1903), he took up the tragic dilemma of the artist with Der Tod in Venedig (1912; Death in Venice), a somber masterpiece.