Todos os Santos Bay

Todos os Santos Bay

(tô`tho͝ozo͝o sän`to͝os) [Port.,=all-saints bay], inlet of the Atlantic Ocean, 25 mi (40 km) long and 20 mi (32 km) wide, E Bahia, Brazil. It receives the Paraguaçu River. Brazil's first oil field (1939) is located N of Salvador, the bay's chief city. Itaparica, a large island at the mouth of the bay, has saltworks and oil fields. The fertile Reconcavo lowland surrounds the bay; subsistence crops, sugarcane, cotton, and tobacco are raised there. Todos os Santos Bay was discovered in 1501 by Amerigo Vespucci.
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rhizophorae from Todos os Santos Bay (Bahia), but these authors didn't make reference to xenoma formation.
The benthic fauna between Todos os Santos Bay and the city of Vitoria in the state of Espirito Santo is the least known in terms of composition on the Brazilian coast; the estuaries and coastal beaches in this part are especially poorly known (Lana et al., 1996).
These pioneer surveys occurred mainly in Salvador and adjacent areas, Todos os Santos Bay, the continental shelf off Salvador, and especially in the Abrolhos Archipelago to the south.
In the 1980s, contributions from Gouvea & Leite (1980) and Gouvea (1986a, 1986b) dealt with the fauna at innumerable sites around Todos os Santos Bay. Carqueija & Gouvea (1996) documented, also in this bay, the occurrence of the non-indigenous swimming-crab Charybdis hellerii (A.
Among the main rivers forming extensive estuarine areas, some deserve special mention: from north to the south, the Paraguacu River, flowing into western Todos os Santos Bay; the Contas River, with its mouth at the city of Itacare; the Pardo River, with its mouth at Canavieiras; the Jequitinhonha River and its mouth at Belmonte, and the Mucuri River, with its mouth at the city of Mucuri (Fig.
Little is still known about the composition of the bottom sediments on the Bahia shelf, especially south of Todos os Santos Bay (Lana et al., 1996).
(1999), Arembepe and Baia de Salvador (= Todos os Santos Bay).
Previous records: Mithrax braziliensis--Rathbun (1892), Mar Grande, Bay of Bahia (= Todos os Santos Bay, Hartt Explorations); Moreira (1901); Gouvea (1986a), Itaparica Island.
braziliensis is Mar Grande, Bay of Bahia (= Todos os Santos Bay) (Rathbun, 1892).
Previous records: Rathbun (1930), Mapele (Simoes Filho, Hartt Explorations) and Bay of Bahia (= Todos os Santos Bay, material deposited in the Copen hagen Museum); Joly et al.
The tides and tidal circulation of Todos os Santos Bay, Northeast Brasil, a general characterization.
Oceanography and suspended material in Todos os Santos Bay. Rev.