Tolkien


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Tolkien

J(ohn) R(onald) R(euel). 1892--1973, British philologist and writer, born in South Africa. He is best known for The Hobbit (1937), the trilogy The Lord of the Rings (1954--55), and the posthumously published The Silmarillion (1977)
References in periodicals archive ?
Tolkien grew up in Birmingham, where he and his friends at King Edward's School formed a club called the Tea Club and Barrovian Society.
Tolkien has inspired an amazing corpus of high quality scholarship produced by a diverse array of scholars, both academic and independent.
Tolkien then wrote 'Lord of the Rings' between 1937 and 1949 as what was initially intended to be a sequel, but the story became much larger and ultimately one of the best-selling novels of all time with more than 150 million copies sold.
He pays homage to Tolkien the illustrator, as well as to the great tradition of other Tolkien illustrators, especially Alan Lee.
Iluvatar, the Father of everything-that-is (Eru, the One: Tolkien 2012) has created the Universe.
According to John Rateliff in The History of The Hobbit, Tolkien probably began developing the original story around the middle of 1930.
I am a great Tolkien fan and was thrilled to discover the school's connection.
This focus is prudent because in many ways Tolkien was a man out of time and place: an African-born Englishman of Edwardian demeanor, a devout Roman Catholic in an Anglican land, a man who revolutionized popular literature in the twentieth century while steeping his own mind in the languages and literatures of a millennium earlier.
Although the author completed his own translation in 1926, he "seems never to have considered its publication," said Christopher Tolkien as he announced the Tolkien estate's new deal with HarperCollins to publish "Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary" on May 22.
After defining "torture" he reminds the reader that Tolkien served in World War I and lived through World War II, and this informs the treatment of prisoners in his fantasy world.
The young Tolkien formed a close friendship with Chris Wiseman, Geoffrey Bache Smith and Rob Gilson, the son of headteacher Cary Gilson.
Michael Tomko suggests that Tolkien may be best understood in the context of an English Catholic view of history, which incorporates patterns of ruin and revival, triumph tempered with loss, man's innate sinful nature, and the concept of the "blessed sadness" (221) of the long defeat.