Tollund

Tollund

 

a village, in central Jutland, near Silkeborg, in Denmark. In 1950, a well-preserved man’s corpse dating from the early Iron Age was found at the bottom of a peat bog in Tollund. The corpse, probably a sacrifice, was lying in a sleeping posture on its right side. On the head was a leather cap, a leather belt was around the trunk, and around the neck was a leather-thong noose, which was evidently used to strangle the man. After restoration, the head was placed on display in the Silkeborg city museum. A number of similar finds have been excavated in Denmark.

References in periodicals archive ?
Heaney, whose work includes Digging and Tollund Man, was made a EX-Commandeur of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French ministry of culture in 1996.
In a sonnet called Excavation & Recovery, Jamie perhaps casts a Bronze Age logboat as her Tollund Man, this relic given up by Tay mud, but her focus shifts to the river, to the means and not the end.
Bill had read about other bog mummies - there was a very famous one in Denmark called the Tollund Man that was found in the 50s - so he wondered, if peat has all these marvellous qualities to preserve people's skin, why not use it in skincare?
We have been looking at 'mysteries' in history, stories of things such as Jack the Ripper and the Tollund Man, where we have to think about what could have happened.
So too with the anxious influence of finding a place to which to return, Fiacc's lines in 'By the Black Stream'--'Cold, bare, not predictable/Poor, bare, crossed in grain'--find a fascinating resonance in Heaney's masterful 'The Tollund Man': (11)
Allen suggests that, as Heaney writes in Tollund," "Things had moved on.
2) The poem Bogland appears in the collection Door Into The Dark (1969); The Tollund Man and Nerthus in Wintering Out (1972); Belderg, Bog Queen, The Grauballe Man, Punishment, Come to the Bower, Strange Fruit and Kinship in North (1975).
Over the years, I have visited other such finds in Denmark and beyond and on one memorable trip, I was to meet Hans Helbaek, whose botanical studies on the food debris of Tollund and Grauballe guts ser a standard not surpassed since.
In The Tollund Man in Springtime the Tollund Man who passes 'Unregistered by scans, screens, hidden eyes' lapping time in himself, finds 'Newfound contrariness':
There is a glimmer of a central theme, which emerges in "The Tollund Man in Springtime," recalling earlier Heaney poems in which bodies that had been buried for centuries in the bogs of his native Ireland symbolize the perpetual blood sacrifice of ancient and modern human beings.
The Tollund Man was found in a Danish peat bog in 1950.
Heaney cast himself as "an inner emigre" (18) in "Singing School," and whose speaker in "The Tollund Man" paradoxically finds himself as "lost, / Unhappy and at home" in Denmark as in Ireland.