tom-tom

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tom-tom,

name popularly applied to high-pitched hand drums, usually barrel-shaped and having either one or two drumheads of skin. They are tunable to specific pitches. Supposedly of Native American or Asian origin, they are sometimes used in modern dance orchestras for special effects. The terms tom-tom and tam-tam are sometimes confused; the latter is another name for the gong.

tom-tom

1. a drum associated either with the American Indians or with Eastern cultures, usually beaten with the hands as a signalling instrument
2. a standard cylindrical drum, normally with one drumhead
References in periodicals archive ?
Campfire items such as tom-toms and/or rattles, headdresses, stories, etc.
Too late deep into the heart of the infernal jungles will throb the terrible telegraphic beating of the tom-toms tirelessly beating beating beating that the negroes won't take anymore won't take anymore being your niggers your filthy negroes.
In "Quand Bat le Tam-tam" [When the Tom-Tom Beats], the poet celebrates the beauty and pull of his African roots.
Later, during the 1920s and 1930s, high-hat cymbals - at first less than one foot high and called low boys (Papa Joe Jones told me in 1981 that he invented the longer rod which brought the high hat to its present, aptly named height, but the Leedy drum company stole his idea and took all the rewards) - bass drum pedals, manufactured mounted and floor tom-toms, and larger cymbals came to be included in the drumset.
As a college student at the Rhode Island School of Design, Tom Huff began haunting flea markets and Salvation Army stores in upstate New York, collecting "Indian kitsch" - plastic Indian figures, toy tom-toms, souvenirs, bottles of firewater," and products such as Cherikee Red Soda and Pow-Wow Cheese Puffs.
The school no longer uses tomahawks or tom-toms at rallies and doesn't dress mascots in American Indian costumes.
He plays four-beat bass drum, and two and four on the hi-hat while soloing with his snare and two tom-toms on Ray Draper's ``Ugh
Months after the tom-toms started beating that Rosie O'Donnell would join Goldie Hawn and Madonna in ``Chicago,'' there's still no telling if the talk-show queen will actually take part in the big-screen adaptation of the musical.